Learning on the Edge: Exploring Our Boundaries Wiki: Summary

This wiki is an ongoing summary of our discussion during the Learning on the Edge: Exploring Our Boundaries seminar.

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Reading List

Reading List

  1. The Tower and The Cloud edited by Richard Katz "addresses some of the promises and pitfalls presented by resources that exist 'in the cloud'." This book is available for free download from Educause - Suggested by Grant Potter.

  2. Education for a Digital World: Advice, Guidelines, and Effective Practice from Around the Globe. Co-published by BCcampus and Commonwealth of Learning, 2008. The description of this book begins with the following, very apt, quote:

    "Our time is a time for crossing barriers, for erasing old categories - for probing around."

    Marshall McLuhan

  3. David Wiley's (Intro_Open_Ed_Syllabus" title="Intro to Open Education Syllabus">Introduction to Open Education) is a wiki for his course of that title. It has references to a large number of articles, many by or related to international educational organizations. - Suggested by Sylvia Riessner.
    (I'll come back to transcribe some of them later).

  4. CBC Ideas program, "Who Owns Ideas?" is a historical overview and current discussion about copyright and related issues.

  5. Grant's reference to the creation of Folksonomies in the Welcome to "Learning on the Edge" thread, led me to a quick Google search which resulted in my finding and reading Folksonomies - Cooperative Classification and Communication Through Shared Metadata. In this paper, Adam Mathes (Dec 2004) suggests that the use of the folksonomy might lower the barrier to participation in categorization and classification presented by formal by providing a system that is easy enough for anyone to use. In addition, speaking of Flickr and Delicious, he suggests that "folksonomy lowers the barriers to cooperation" by remoivng the need to agree in advance on a set of categories and by providing good feedback, shared meanings can rapidly develop.