Active Learning Strategies for Online Learning: September 10 - 30, 2007

YouTube

YouTube

by Dr. Nellie Deutsch -
Number of replies: 22

Dr Michael Wesch and his students from the University of Kansas participated in a digital ethnography project on YouTube community in the spring of 2007 as part of their anthropology class and produced a 3-5 minute video. What would you consider the value understanding the YouTube environment and its individuals? Would it provide one with a greater understanding of the scope of human interaction? Would this be valuable to teachers and understanding the digital natives? Your comments are appreciated.

Please check this website and one of the many videos of the project.

Thank you.

Nellie


In reply to Dr. Nellie Deutsch

Re: YouTube

by Deirdre Bonnycastle -
I loved the video about using UTube in a class.
I use UTube and TeacherTube to add educational and inspirational videos to my faculty development blog. I also use it to illustrate concepts that need visual representations (see my wiki for this session http://technologyactivelearning.pbwiki.com/) All of these are fairly passive uses for the learner.

When I taught in a more formal setting, I had students create videos regularly as part of the students English and work ed classes. I found it to be a really powerful way to give students a voice in the class. UTube would have allowed them to share that voice with family and friends.
In reply to Deirdre Bonnycastle

Re: YouTube

by Nalin Abeysekera -

I suppose to finish one instructional video on marketing mix next month. I need some interesting promotions to put. This is for my University purpose.What is the best palce to get some clips?   …..

In reply to Dr. Nellie Deutsch

Re: YouTube

by Inge Ignatia de Waard -
Dear Nellie

What a great project. I have a few questions.

First let me tell you my interest/background. With the start of the new academic year I have been testing a vodcasting site that - in the longrun - will get students accustomed and into the blogging and Web2.0 sphere.
But because most of my students come from developing countries the previous experience with either multimedia or computer literacy is very different.

The vodcasting blog is still in its infancy, so we started with examples of movies that show students. This was necessary to give them an idea of the possibilities and get them into it.

my questions:
Did you provide students with tutorials on how to make movies, or what web2.0 is all about?
What was the initial computer/multimedia literacy of the student groups?
Do your students have a specific Web2.0 or multimedia class prior to this course?

I saw you will be co-moderating the seminar on developing countries? I am looking forward to that.

thank you for sharing your experience
greetings
In reply to Inge Ignatia de Waard

Re: YouTube

by Deirdre Bonnycastle -
Ignatia, I love the idea of a medical vodcast site. Would you be interested in some U of Saskatchewan involvement or is this a closed site.
In reply to Deirdre Bonnycastle

Re: YouTube

by Inge Ignatia de Waard -
hi Deirdre

The site was build to be used by students of ITM or partner institutions. We wanted to offer the concept of vodcasting as one of the extra's that could be learned.

Your offer is very tempting though. What kind of an involvement did you have in mind? Maybe we can develop a plan?

Let me know your thoughts. If I remember correctly you have projects with remote areas? Do you work with Local Area Networks in those areas?
In reply to Inge Ignatia de Waard

Re: YouTube

by Dr. Nellie Deutsch -
Hi Ignatia de Waard,
Thank you for introducing your project. I have only began the process of implementing video into my classes. I use Moodle where it is quite easy to embed videos. I choose videos from YouTube or TeacherTube for my students to watch and respond to. My choice of videos depends on the themes and subjects discussed in class. I find audio presentations very dry after using video. My goal is to get my students to produce their own videos.

I am looking forward to "seeing" you at the seminar.

Nellie
In reply to Dr. Nellie Deutsch

Re: YouTube

by Jim Julius -
The California State University is taking some serious steps toward requiring full accessibility of web-based materials. As an instructional tech advocate, I think there is much wisdom in this, but I am also concerned that faculty who are beginning to realize the value in incorporating web-based videos, simulations, flash tutorials, virtual worlds, etc. - all of which can be a great boon to many learners who are currently disadvantaged by the more typical text-and-talk modes of instruction - will be discouraged from moving in this direction by all-or-nothing orders to provide captioning, etc.

I am hopeful that in 5-10 years this will be a moot point as the technology will catch up with us ... but anyone have insights at this point on best ways to deal with this?
In reply to Jim Julius

Re: YouTube

by Dr. Nellie Deutsch -
Hi Jim,
Thank you for joining in the discussion. I am not sure whether I understood you correctly. Are you showing concern about the legal aspects of using video for instruction?

Thank you.
In reply to Dr. Nellie Deutsch

Re: YouTube

by Jim Julius -
Yes - if the video is a part of the course but is not fully accessible to the blind or deaf, there is concern that the university could be found in violation of US laws/regulations (Sec. 508 of 1973 Rehabilitation Act, Americans with Disabilities Act) and/or be liable to have complaints filed with the Office of Civil Rights.
In reply to Jim Julius

Re: YouTube

by Deirdre Bonnycastle -
The University of Saskatchewan started a similar program of capturing lectures in our large lecture theaters and posting them to a secure site. We had to promise profs that they would be removed at the end of each semester and recaptured each time the class was taught.
In reply to Deirdre Bonnycastle

Re: YouTube

by E.A. Draffan -

Accessibility issues for videos are something we have worried about, as captioning is something that not everyone can do easily - it takes time and has to be good - There is a free captioning tool available from NCAM - Magpie

EASI have provided training courses on the subject of making multimedia accessible and there is a very useful website called 'Skills for Access' that provides useful ways of making many multmedia items accessible as does Webaim.  

JISC have just published a project report with a series of Learner Voices using videos and they have taken a different route to make them accessible. An additional Word file with a summary and verbatim text. (on the CD the summary also includes snap shots so you know where you are in the video.

Hope this helps - best wishes E.A.

In reply to E.A. Draffan

Re: YouTube

by Jim Julius -
Thanks, E.A. Yes, we know about many of these and other similar resources. The question for me is less about the technical solutions/approaches which exist now, and more related to
a) philosophy - does it make sense for a public institution of higher education to absolutely require all web-based instructional media to be fully accessible?
and
b) scalability and outreach - to the extent that we do try to reach every professor to inform them about accessibility concerns/requirements, resources, tools, and techniques, how do we do so without scaring them away from incorporating rich media into their online resources?

What would the service model look like that enables large numbers of faculty just dipping their feet into the realm of rich online learning resources and activities to do so successfully and in compliance with accessibility rules/guidelines?
In reply to Jim Julius

Re: YouTube

by E.A. Draffan -

Jim - Please may I pass your question on to the ATHEN (Assistive Technology HE network) as we are just debating the issue and trying to come up with some guidelines!  It is a real quandary and TechDis and many other UK organisations have started to look at it in a much more holistic way. We know there are so many pluses for using rich media and I am enjoying exploring the issues with disabled students on the LexDis project so will be able to discuss it much more fully in a years time! So far some are really making use of all aspects, but others are struggling to cope with the mass of data and tend to stick with traditional methods of studying - in much the same way the lecturers cope with the new ideas! 

Best wishes E.A.  

In reply to E.A. Draffan

Re: YouTube

by Jim Julius -
E.A. - Please do feel free to pass along these thoughts. Here's another way I'm asking the question.

Many are seeing this accessibility push within the CSU as an opportunity to introduce the concept of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to faculty. My concern is that perhaps the two may conflict rather than complement one another.

If a faculty member wishes to add rich media for students to use, in general that seems like a positive thing with regard to UDL. Offering a variety of presentations of content and ways for students to engage with that content is a cornerstone of UDL.

But if faculty are stymied by accessibility regulations, my concern is that they will simply choose to continue business as usual, focusing on text-based PPTs and lectures as the primary mode of communication.

If UDL is the focus, then rather than trying to create literal captions/descriptions/transcripts of all rich media - especially as that media gets further away from talking heads, doesn't it make more sense to consider the needs of text-oriented learners who wouldn't be able to access the rich media, and produce a different learning object which more effectively addresses their learning needs?
In reply to Jim Julius

Re: YouTube

by Deirdre Bonnycastle -
I actually saw a course that had different versions for people who were visually impaired and another for people who were hearing impaired and another for learning issues. It was a nightmare, not only because of the cost of creating multiple versions but also the cost of updating. Factor in the number of courses versus the number of students with disabilities and it becomes cheaper to retrofit as opposed to create multiple versions.

In Canada, the definition includes a statement about "reasonable accommodations" so there is a need for universities to define what is reasonable. Blackboard and Dreamweaver for example have built in accessibility tools that are easy to use and meet W3W standards. I would expect all designers of web courses to use those. For more information in this area, see a previous discussion on SCoPE about accessibility.
In reply to Jim Julius

Re: YouTube

by margot mcneill -
Hi Jim,
The question of how to encourage 'large numbers of faculty (to dip) their feet into the realm of rich online learning resources and activities' can seem a little less threatening if we approach it from the angle of students' rather than the teachers' activity. For example, if the students are happy to experiment with the new media, then perhaps they can be the ones who use/ generate/ create the online resources and undertake the activities. As an example, requiring students to 'present' their responses to an issue or a question can give them freedom as to how they choose to do this. Some will probably still submit a piece of text such as an essay, but others may compose using a blog, a video shared on YouTube, or a model shared on Google Sketch-up's 3D warehouse.
Then the teacher doesn't have to do the 'serious' engagement, but the students do.
Just a thought,
Margot



In reply to margot mcneill

Re: YouTube

by Jim Julius -
Margot, You raise a good point, though it wasn't exactly my question. I certainly resonate with the notion of empowering learners to seek out, create, and share course-related resources they find to be useful. Two challenges associated with this approach: The pedagogy you are describing may be equally if not more challenging for faculty who are used to being the dispensers of knowledge/information to understand and implement compared to having faculty select and provide rich media in accordance with their vision for the course. Second, I think there is a huge gray area here with regard to accessibility. If faculty do empower students to do rich media projects, share relevant online resources, and create presentations for one another, do those projects also fall under the accessibility rules & regulations?
In reply to Jim Julius

Re: YouTube

by E.A. Draffan -

I have to say accessibility and usability issues are the reason why I want to experiment before committing to some of the Web 2.0 applications.   To test the ease with which students can add materials as well as read or download them once they are on a website. 

I feel the output would fall under UK's DDA and we have the Disability Equality Duty for public sector bodies.

Best wishes E.A.

In reply to Jim Julius

Re: YouTube

by margot mcneill -
Hi Jim,
As you suggest, it is the teachers' teaching paradigm that can limit the usefulness of the tools. My daughter's current teacher invites the students to present their research however they like - the research and the reflections are the important part not so much the presentation.

In response to your second para, these projects are no more subject to the accessibility requirements that other students' works, such as the cardboard and glue models or posters that other students made. They were not designed to be presented to the class, just marked by the teacher.
Cheers,
Margot
In reply to margot mcneill

Re: YouTube

by Deirdre Bonnycastle -
I'm a great supporter of student created resources. For example in Grade 10 Psych, my daughter made a video about a teenager confronting her schizophrenia that the instructor and other students liked so much it became part of the teaching material for the class. My daughter expanded the concept into a successful Fringe play and is hoping to eventually make a movie.

The deeper issue with my daughter's experience is she is extremely dyslexic and has tremendous difficulty writing essays. She dropped out of school in Grade 11 because she was fed up with not getting the accommodations she needed in math and science. LD advocates in Saskatchewan use her story to lobby the government for better accommodations.

Teachers who allowed her to create projects to express what she was learning were consistently impressed with the research and thought that went into her work. Other students who saw her projects stopped treating her as if she was incompetent and wanted her on their teams. Teachers who insisted she conform to traditional class norms considered her to be a marginal student at best.