Developing a National Framework of Teaching Expectations: March 2-22, 2009

Topic 2: The structure of a teacher-training framework

Topic 2: The structure of a teacher-training framework

by Gary Hunt -
Number of replies: 7
For week two (March 9-15) the focus will be on the attributes of a good teacher-training framework. What are the critical components of a training programme? Should the framework be different for training graduate students compared to junior faculty or professional development for senior faculty? What can other countries take from the UK experience?
In reply to Gary Hunt

Re: Topic 2: The structure of a teacher-training framework

by Colby Stuart -
Another paper worth reading for perspective:
Research and Practice in K-12 Online Learning: A Review of Open Access Literature

From abstract: "This paper reviews open access literature in K-12 online learning and reports on a structured content analysis of the documents. Themes in the literature include steady growth and a focus on the benefits, challenges, and broad effectiveness of K-12 online learning. In addition, newly developed standards for K-12 online learning are emerging in descriptions of effective practices."
In reply to Gary Hunt

Re: Topic 2: The structure of a teacher-training framework

by Deirdre Bonnycastle -
Should the framework be different for training graduate students compared to junior faculty or professional development for senior faculty?

Yes and no. Graduate students primarily teach in undergraduate ed and need more of the basic theory/tips for teaching and opportunities for feedback on their teaching.

Senior faculty need more of the one-on-one/small group idea exploring and teaching with new technology sessions. Senior faculty are more ready to explore teaching philosophies and in some ways are more able to be risk takers because they have tenure.


In reply to Deirdre Bonnycastle

Re: Topic 2: The structure of a teacher-training framework

by Barbara Berry -
Hi Deirdre,
I would expect that all instructors would have to attend to the same core competencies proposed by the UK Professional Standards Framework. Although as you suggest, the applications may vary depending on a number of factors such as interests, proficiencies as a teacher within their own discipline and teaching contexts and students. The UK framework seems very general and thus allows for a broad scope of teaching practices.

It may be useful to consider (as in other professions) novice, intermediate and advanced as categories for distinguishing levels of proficiency in applying the teaching framework which suggests a scaffolding model. Another way would be to consider a "constructivist" approach to applying the framework....what would it look like? Would there even be a national standards framework in a constructivist environment?

what do you think?

Barb





In reply to Gary Hunt

it depends...

by Valerie Taylor -
My experience is facilitating professional development workshops - non-mandatory, but apply to professional growth awards (aka raises). There some topics that are best taught specifically to new instructors. They need time to process fundamental concepts of teaching and learning. Their concerns and questions are about the foundations and groundwork. They are usually feeling their way, drawing on how they were taught, without understanding how that becomes "best practices". Experienced instructors in these sessions only heighten their anxiety about what they don't know.

In other sessions - applying technology, for example, a mix of experienced and inexperienced instructors often yields lively discussions and a wealth of ideas that are beneficial to all.

Mentoring and peer-to-peer reviews where there is a formal relationship are other ways to develop both parties. One of the models that seems promising is the "clinical" model - similar to the support provided to medical practitioners of all sorts. As I understand it, there are regular communications and a specific cyclical "process" that includes self-assessment, review, evaluation and improvement plan. Is anyone familiar with the model? Can it be adapted for ongoing higher education instructor education and training?