Developing a National Framework of Teaching Expectations: March 2-22, 2009

Seminar Structure

Seminar Structure

by Gary Hunt -
Number of replies: 6
Because there are many facets to our broad topic of teaching expectations, we would like to focus on three main topics at different times during the seminar. While we welcome comments on any aspect of the topic at any time during the seminar, we plan to divide the topics as described below.

For the first week (March 2-8) the focus will be on the desired outcomes of a national system of training and credentialing. Here are some questions that we could address. What benefits do national systems have that are not possible with regional or institutional systems? How much of a benefit is portability of a credential? Is the quality of teacher training better under a national framework compared to that in separate institutions?

For week two (March 9-15) the focus will be on the attributes of a good teacher-training framework. What are the critical components of a training programme? Should the framework be different for training graduate students compared to junior faculty or professional development for senior faculty? What can other countries take from the UK experience?

For week three (March 16-22) the focus will be on required resources. What are the personnel and financial resources required to develop, implement, and maintain a national system? What are examples of appropriate national bodies that have the ability to oversee and run a national initiative?
In reply to Gary Hunt

Re: Seminar Structure

by Jo Ann Hammond-Meiers -
Dear Gary,
Thanks for giving us some time to think about this and notifying us about the topic and subtopics. That is helpful -- and I will just make a brief comment, knowing that we are not starting officially til the week of March 2.

A national perspective is worth exploring; I am aware of the difficulties crossing provinces in lots of areas of practice, not just teaching. I'm curious if there would be enough collaborative leadership to develop this vision. Whether it is worthy, to me, the answer if yes if it streamlines research about education and elearning, in particular, and more quality learning evaluations, more financial support for learners, and collaborative partnerships in research.

This topic links to some of the work from the Pan Canadian Scope conference, and I'm glad it has resurfaced.

Jo Ann

In reply to Jo Ann Hammond-Meiers

Re: Seminar Structure

by Gary Hunt -
Hi Jo Ann,
Thank you for initiating our discussion. You have hit on an important issue about the need for collaboration and resources. Because we have no federal mandate for post-secondary education in Canada, we tend to be very regionalized in developing educational initiatives. A good example of this is the Ontario expectations for undergraduates and graduates. Guidelines for University Undergraduate Degee Level Expectations (Ontario Council of Academic Vice Presidents), and Guidelines for University Graduate Degree Level Expectations(Ontario College of Graduate Studies) are Provincially mandated. I think these are very beneficial initiatives and I wish we had the equivalent in BC.

The UK systems are Federally driven so they were developed through wide feedback and collaboration.

I am sure we will have more comments about how e-learning fits into this national concept. Would we need to have a special qualification for e-learning?

Gary

In reply to Gary Hunt

Re: Seminar Structure

by Nalin Abeysekera -

Hello Gary,

It is interesting to discuss about this topic. Because in the sense of marketing we(teachers) should understand the needs and wants(expectations) of customers(students).And it is a national requirement too.As you mentioned we can discuss about the present and future scenarios with real life examples. And I have a doubt whether this is only about e-learning or the both face to face and online.

In sri lanka we are using the UK system (because we have been ruled by UK in past) in education but I think there are some areas which has been not touched by the administrators.(we need certain adaptations!!!)..

I will try to involve as I can for this fruitful discussion cause I think this one of the key area in this century.

In reply to Nalin Abeysekera

Re: Seminar Structure

by Gary Hunt -
Thank you for your post Nalin. A national system of expectations will provide a reference framework of the essential knowledge and skills that post-secondary teachers should have. I see this as part of our professional obligation to be accountable and transparent about what we do.

Although many people refer to our students as "customers," I view the relationship very differently. I see them more as partners or colleagues in an extended educational journey. They integrate into the teaching and learning environment with us and have an intrinsic interest in the processes associated with their learning development. I think this is fundamentally different from "customers" in the sense of retail marketing.

I am very interested in your comment about needing adaptations from the UK system. It would be great if you could unpack that one for use--in what ways does the UK system not meet your needs?
In reply to Gary Hunt

Re: Seminar Structure

by Nalin Abeysekera -

Hello Hunt,

Yes 100% agreed on the  word of customer and relationship..it is more than customer…It is our duty as teachers to understand, motivate and inspire them for learning. You are extremely correct.

The present educational system of Sri Lanka derives from the British educational system, which was introduced by the British colonial masters in the 19th century. The British colonial government established colleges for boys and girls separately. These colleges consisted of Primary Schools, Lower Secondary and Higher Secondary Schools. And because of this system students who are in the higher secondary schools (Collegiate Level ) getting only specialized in one stream.(science, maths ,arts or commerce).But only 15% of the students can get the chance to do to the University.That is the main problem I can see. Students are not getting any knowledge in their advanced level period other than their specializing subjects. If he /She is a science student then he/she is not getting more rounded education like broad coverage of the humanities, foreign languages, arts. Once you get 2A’ and one B’ in science you can’t go the medical college in Sri Lanka. Because universities they don’t have enough space.Can we asked that students to do the exam again?? Unfortunately they are doing that for the second time. This is the pathetic situation. And more importantly there is a perception of the country that once you do science you should go the medical college. but I personally like to see the change. If he/she did science there should be a change in thinking pattern. once you pass with 3c’s system should provide or absorb them. And more interestingly our literacy level is 92%!!!

But i think we can discuss these in the future!!!!1

 

In reply to Gary Hunt

Re: Seminar Structure

by Alice Macpherson -
Gary

I am very happy that you are pursuing this initiative. I truly think that its time has come.