The Educational Value of Podcasting: October 4-22, 2006

Podcasting and Oral Tradition

Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Heather Ross -
Number of replies: 10
On the way home from work tonight I was listening to the CBC where they were talking about a Head Start program for First Nations, Inuit and Metis children. The report included  the importance of including cultural pride and understanding for these children, and how far this went in helping pre-schoolers be prepared to succeed and eventually be leaders. One girl in particular was being profiled and, because I had another discussion board going through my head, I wondered if she might blog (she was really amazing).

It took less than five seconds for my brain to do a shift over to our current discussion.  I'm wondering if anyone knows of educators working with students of aboriginal heritage and podcasting. I think that this would be a natural extension of the oral tradition inherent throughout aboriginal culture

Anyone have anything to add to this?
In reply to Heather Ross

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Ava Dean -
Heather, At our school we do a lot with oral tradition and, with your permission, I'd like to put this post out to our whole school.  I've copied and pasted it into a word file that I would attach to a staff@nvit.bc.ca email.  Let me know if that's ok with you.
In reply to Ava Dean

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Heather Ross -
Ava,

That would be wonderful. If anyone wanted to continue a conversation with me about this I be would be available.
In reply to Heather Ross

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Richard Smith -
Wonderful question/suggestion, Heather. I don't have anything like an "oral tradition" focus in my teaching.... or do I?

My family is big on family stories, and as my mother has frequently noted - no story is so minor that it can't be embroidered into a bigger story by my father. Tales of the past (distant and recent), colourfully remembered, are a staple around our dinner table.

I think many (most?) of our students can connect with such things. And if you think about it, what is the lecture but story-telling? And seminars? Isn't that foundational for the oral tradition?

I know podcasts might seem a bit too "one way" for effective story telling, but I'd like to hear some alternative examples. I have been podcasting regularly for a course now for six weeks, but it has - so far - all been FROM me and TO the students. I wonder if we can get something going FROM the students to ME (and each other).

Suggestions on how to make this work? I wonder if I can use voice mail to record stories via the telephone. Certainly skype works for this... perhaps I should subscribe to a skype voicemail account and try that out.... in fact, I think I will... right now!

...r

In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Richard Smith -
OK. I am ready to "walk the talk" and I have set myself up with Skype VoiceMail. I don't think this code will work because it involves JavaScript, but I'll give it a try:

Skype Me™!

The simple approach is to give out my skype address: richard_k_smith ...r

In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition (skype and Second life)

by Susanne Nyrop -
Hi Richard,

I wanted to have you as my Skype contact, but  richard_k_smith apparently was not enough to find you. Could you please invite me?  I'm sus_nyrop on Skype

anyone who would like to stay in touch,  do send a message whenever you see me online!

In reply to Heather Ross

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition - among natives

by David Millar -
Heather, for a superb example of podcasting by native youth see
Wapikoni mobile
http://www.nfb.ca/aventures/wapikonimobile/excursionWeb/films.php  caravane mobile de l’ONF: films, vidéos, voix et chansons en mp3 réalisés par jeunes des Premières Nations
and
NFB Aboriginal Perspectives
http://www.nfb.ca/enclasse/doclens/visau/index.php?language=english
an online educational resource of many classic documentaries; under the "Youth" link it contains at least one of the Wapikoni films, by Episkapie, a young Inuit.

They should be an inspiring example to schools elsewhere.
When I have time I'm going to post a compilation of "city storytelling" projects to the wiki.


In reply to Heather Ross

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Nancy Riffer -
I came across a short video chronicaling sharing done in the first people's project.  (Click on the video icon on this page to hear about the Choctaw Indians project.)  It is a window into crosscultural projects that are being done around the world using technology and involving first peoples.  Podcasting seems a natural next step.


In reply to Nancy Riffer

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Heather Ross -
Thank you David and Nancy.

Nancy this video is wonderful. This project is so inspiring and important.
In reply to Heather Ross

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Deirdre Bonnycastle -
I worked a lot with Aboriginal peoples in the past and there is an assumption that oral tradition=auditory learners=podcast/lecture. It doesn't quite work that way. The oral tradition of most aboriginal cultures tell visual stories in a hypnotic way that captures visual/emotional imagination.
In reply to Deirdre Bonnycastle

Re: Podcasting and Oral Tradition

by Heather Ross -
Deirdre,

I'm thinking more in terms of the students making the podcasts. The example earlier of the students making videos and interviewing elders and others is what I'm getting at. Maybe vodcasts would be better than podcasts.