The Educational Value of Podcasting: October 4-22, 2006

Introductions

Introductions

by Richard Smith -
Number of replies: 34
I suppose the best way to start an online discussion is with some introductions. In this case, who are you and what is your experience (if any) with podcasting?

I will go first:

My name is Richard Smith and I am a professor at SFU. I teach in the school of communication and I have been podcasting for about a year and a half.

My experience in educational podcasting has been in my second year course on information technology and society. I do an "enhanced podcast," which means I can be heard and my powerpoint (keynote) slides are "flipping" in the iTunes/iPod screen.

I look forward to hearing your introductions and once we've done that I'd like to move through three additional questions, which we'll put into separate discussion topics (I'll create these in the coming days):

1. What do you think is possible with podcasting in an educational context?

2. What do you think is desireable with podcasting in an educational context?

3. What to you worry about when you think about podcasting?

Anyway, let's hear from you!

...r
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Maggie Verster -

Hi Richard,

My name is Maggie and I am an educational consultant working with maths teachers in the rural areas and townships in South Africa . I am doing my masters this year in computer based education and am currently trying to create an online community of practice for maths literacy teachers. I also run a community maths website.

Podcasting is not used in my country at all. If you mention it people go ...hhhhuh? I am still struggling to get everybody to use computers, let alone the internet. So I am investigating podcasting as a means to reach more teachers in a more effortless way. Most of my teachers have cellphones. So this discussion is indeed important to me and I am glad to be here.

Maggie

 

In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Brian Cann -
Hi, I'm Brian. I teach math face-to-face and online for UMUC's overseas program in Europe. My primary research interests are math anxiety and getting beyond the print metaphor in online math teaching. I'm currently located in Heidelberg, Germany.
I have toyed with the idea of using podcasts and have gone so far as record a couple of short "fireside chats" in mp3 format for posting in my online classrooms. Although I subscribe to a number of math podcasts aimed at the level of the students who I primarily teach and can see some clear potential uses, recording and producing my own is still someways in the distance - this may be one of those areas where I am happier discussing theoretical and philosophical aspects than actually getting my hands dirty and doing it myself!
I look forward to interacting with you all in this seminar.
Cheers
Brian
In reply to Brian Cann

Re: Introductions

by nicki dabner -
Kia ora Richard, Maggie, Brian. I'm involved teaching visual art and professional studies to primary pre-service students at the ChCh College of Education in the South Island (Lord of the Rings country) in New Zealand. I also lecture in the post-grad ICT qualification, have developed an online community for recent graduates and am currently completing my Masters with a focus upon e-learning and online communities. I'm toying with the idea of adding podcasts as a feature of an online visual art course I've developed- think this will add value for both my distance folk and be handy for the on campus groups as well...reasonably comfortable with the 'how' but interested in discussing the why and really considering the potential for engaging my students (as a beside I'm comitted to ensuring the new generation of educators have had first hand experiences with different forms of e-technologies in order to be able to consider the potential for use in the classroom with kids AND engage in the debate surounding the use of these technologies...academic uptake of ICT at my institution is low but hey, I love a challenge and can maybe interest some other staff by testing the waters....looking forward to the discussion and ideas sharing by those who have already waded in....
Arohanui
Nicki
In reply to nicki dabner

Re: Introductions

by Richard Smith -
You ask about the "why" - we've started a second thread on the (potential) benefits of podcasts and hopefully some of the WHYs are going to emerge there.
In reply to Brian Cann

math podcasts?

by Sarah Haavind -
I'm intrigued with Brian's mention here of "math podcasts" and wonder if Brian, or anyone who might have one or two to recommend, would be willing to share with us a math podcast for math learners (or for those suffering from math anxiety?). Any level would be interesting. You have piqued my curiosity there.
Thanks,
Sarah
In reply to Sarah Haavind

Re: math podcasts?

by Brian Cann -
Sure Sarah, I can point you in the direction of two math podcasts  both of which are easily found and subscribed to via iTunes.

Dan's Mathcast    now up to installment #19 + 2 video podcasts http://www.dansmath.com/pages/podpage.html

Mathgrad  podcast  with 18 installments
http://www.mathgrad.com/

I subscribe to both of these although I admit to being horribly behind on listening to the episodes. Both series have a radio show format which makes for varid listening and for the most part seem to talk about math rather than "do" math. Dan Bach does actually talk listeners through the solutions of some problems, at least in early episodes that I've listened to, but you really don't want to try and follow, I think, without a pencil and paper at hand.

I see both as "pioneer" work in many respects - they have started to explore what is possible, set the bar at some level of production values, and have introduced some interesting topics. For the rest of us, they also raise questions as to whether things could be improved upon or whether new approaches might be tried out.

I wonder about who listens to them? Probably not those with math anxiety, since math avoidance is one of the symptoms of math anxiety! I think it would be possible to construct something similar for people who struggle with the relevence of math or who feel excluded from math (both groups are likely to display some math anxiety in some situations), but to do so, I wouldn't start with math topics: I'd start with addressing the social context of math, examine its place in the school curriculum and consider why it seem to need a different set of study skills to other subjects.
Cheers
Brian
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Salvor Gissurardottir -
Hi, my name is Salvor and I live in Reykjavik, Iceland. I teach at Iceland University of Education (my university will merge with University of Iceland in 2008), my field is educational technology.

I have been trying out podcasting tools the last few years but this year I for the first time made it assignment for my students to have their own podcasts.  That is because it is so easy to to podcasts in ELGG learning landscape.  Actually you only has to upload files and tell people what is your rss feed.
Here is a screencast I made for my students about how to make podcasts in ELGG and how to subscribe to podcast via iTunes. It is in Icelandic but since the interface is in English then maybe you will understand. I could  also have this in English if somebody whats to use it or give the avi file to you.
http://fyrirlestrar.khi.is/salvor/elgg-podcast/elgg-podcast.html

In reply to Salvor Gissurardottir

Hello from a likely lurker

by Alice MacGillivray -
Hi Salvor - good to "see" you again, and hello to others.
I'm Alice MacGillivray, and other than listening to stories from the fringe for some time, I am brand new to podcasting.  I say "lurker" (in the sense of legitimate peripheral participation) because I don't have an urgent need to use these technologies at present.  In the past, I have used a range of social technologies in graduate knowledge management courses for working professionals.  At present, I am in a doctoral program where the school is interested in new ways of enabling engagement at a distance.
I responded to Salvor's post not just because we have met, but because I tend to "teach" in areas in which I want the course participants to be very actively involved, and Salvor gave us the first hint of what is happening/could happen with student participation.
In reply to Salvor Gissurardottir

Re: Introductions

by Richard Smith -
I am amazed at the ease of use of ELGG - what a nice tool. I have signed up for an account, just to see how it works.

I am also interested in the software you have used to make that screencast. I have similar software for my Mac, but not the nice little yellow dot around the cursor, which is a nice touch.

Screencasts, I think, are a great way to introduce people to new information, even things that have nothing to do with using a computer per se - The traditional use it for software training, but you can use them to narrate just about anything that you can display on a computer screen.

Podcasts, are a natural way to distribute these screencasts, and I think we should all remember that .mov, m4v, .pdf, .txt and so on are all legitimate formats to use for a podcast, and not just mp3... but that's for later, when we've finished with our introductions!

...r
In reply to Salvor Gissurardottir

screencast?

by Sarah Haavind -
Hi all,
Perhaps I'm a bit late, but I am interested in this dialogue. Thank you for hosting it, Richard and Sylvia!

Salvor, I tried to view your elgg screencast (screencast?) and all I got on my iBook G4 with tiger was a flash-looking, moving screen saying "screencast loading." I could hear your voice (that was neat) but with neither the Icelandic nor the images...any idea why I never saw the "interface" (or was that it?).

In reply to Richard Smith

Hello from a city in upstate NY

by Nancy Riffer -
I've done f2f training in the mental health system in NY State for a number of years. 
Over the last 3-4 years I've participated in and led some online classes and attended several online conferences and workshops.  I co-led an online graduate course on change in schools.

Recently, I met someone at an online conference on Appreciative Inquiry who is using SKYPE to build understanding across international boundaries by way of creating soap operas.  See www.brookenya.org   Excitement about this has brought me back to online learning/teaching and its potential.  I participated in the session at SCoPE on informal learning.  Informal learning is a great  name for what interests me.  The part of online work that I'm drawn to is interactive and involves "improvisation" based in knowing an area well. I enjoy this aspect of podcasts recorded from "live" situations.

Here is one situation in which I might use podcasting knowledge.  I am on the board of schools for boys and girls in the northwest part of Pakistan.  See  www.ibtida.org   One of our hopes is to connect schools in Pakistan with schools in the US. as sister schools.  Our schools in Pakistan have computers and internet access.  Podcasts may be one way to make connections.

I look forward to getting to know everyone better.
In reply to Nancy Riffer

Re: Hello from a city in upstate NY

by Richard Smith -
I am astonished at the incredible geographic diversity here - I had no idea this was going to involve such a wide range of people. I think we should let the "invitations" topic sit for one more day, and then start in with some additional topics.

In the mean time, feel free to respond to each others' introductions (as many of you already have), and encourage friends and relatives (ahem, other educational professionals) to join in.

...r
In reply to Nancy Riffer

BrooKenya etc.

by Alice MacGillivray -
Thank you for this provocative post, Nancy.  I suspect people who feel tied into strict curricula might scratch their heads, but I see the seeds of some phenomenal ideas here.

When I look at the BrooKenya site, I am reminded of work I used to do in environmental education for the general public and school groups.  In most organizations, we focused on content; presentation skills were assessed simplistically (clarity, accuracy, structure and so on).  However, in one organization, our focus was on people and culture first, with the formal content [read curriculum if you will] as subtext.  We did almost nothing presentation-like.  We used the latest trends in music, television, etc. and used many media (low tech in those days) such as theatre.  We tried several measures of success, and the people-based approach seemed to be more effective, not to mention more interesting.

Your post has added a whole new dimension on the potential of podcasting, and alternative futures for education.
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by WL Wong -
Hi everyone,

Greetings from Down Under. I work in the area of providing support and training to staff in the areas of using LMS for f2f and online learning at ACU. That includes applying/using innovative approaches in teaching and learning online. Podcasting is of interest to our academic staff members and I am following the feedback, responses and research in this area - to ascertain benefits or otherwise for staff/students. We deal with a range of students; some in the cites, etc but others in the outback where telecommunications can be a real problem/challenge - when telephone wires go down in a storm - they have no way of using the Internet... Costs of internet access is still high and we do have students connecting using dial-ups.

Cheers,
Wai-Leng Wong
In reply to WL Wong

Re: Introductions

by Richard Smith -
Wai-Leng,

I wonder if we should move part of this discussion to the thread (which I haven't started yet) on the downside/dangers of podcasts. Certainly technical failure can be a problem.

On the plus side, I can imagine a CD-mailout of several podcast episodes might be a way to get around slow/no connections. While it might lack the immediacy of online distribution, it would be cheap and would bring multimedia content to those who might otherwise lack it.

...r
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Heather Ross -
Hi there.

Heather Ross from Saskatoon here. I've been fortunate enough to be involved in three podcasts thus far and am looking forward to many more.

I think that podcasting is already playing a significant and growing role in education:
  •  Students are trying it out just as they have video, newspaper and other forms of media production in the past.
  • Educators are using it to share their lectures.
  • Many involved in education are podcasting about educational issues.
I think that podcasting is making it easier to provide new venues for informal learning. I can listen to a podcast of a history lecture from an institution in another country. In some cases I can listen to entire courses worth of lectures. Podcasting is also making it easier for educators to share ideas through their own podcasts (as I mentioned above).

As for your last question, Richard, what are the dangers ... right off the bat I think that podcasting has grown so quickly we may be looking at backlash from some powers-that-be as we've seen with attempts at blocking and censoring social networking Web sites.

Anyway, this is just my pre-coffee two cents.

You can listen to some of the podcasts I've been on at http://www.mctoonish.com/blog/?page_id=203
In reply to Heather Ross

Re: Introductions

by Richard Smith -
Heather,

I just mentioned in a post to Wai-Leng that we might want to start up the "dangers" thread earlier than later so we can capture some of these thoughts. Certainly "backlash" could be a problem. Clearly students equipped to download podcasts are also equipped to download a lot of other, less desireable, material.

iTunesU, which our university is starting to use, could be placed inside a campus/institutional firewall, which might help a bit. But I never underestimate people's ability to fear the unknown.

...r
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Elizabeth Lowe -

Hi, All,

I am Liz Lowe - an instructional designer at West Virginia University in the U.S. We have produced three podcasts thus far through our Instructional Technology Resources Center. Our informational podcasts are geared toward faculty interests. Topics include - how to moderate online chats and discussions, preparing students for taking courses via WebCT Vista, and how to use a university-created system for requesting course migrations, blank shells, and adding roles. We have used an interview format (open to other formats) and try to capsule the information into three main points - providing an overarching advanced organizer. We also summarize the information after each main point and transition into the next point (assisting the listener in knowing where s/he is in the audio content).

I look forward to hearing - rather seeing your ideas on podcasting.

Liz

In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Sarah Haavind -
Hi everyone,
I greet you from the middle of Massachusetts, on the east coast of the US. I am on the faculty at Lesley University, teaching online courses for elementary (ages 6-11) school science teachers earning their masters' degree in inquiry-based science education. Our courses are delivered in an exclusively asynchronous environment. I do not yet have a lot of experience using podcasts, nor any strong opinions formed so far...but I am listening with interest to your conversation.
Sarah
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Allan Greenberg -

Hello All;

My name is Allan Greenberg here in Brooklyn NY USA. I teach both f2f and online at New York University and Brooklyn College. I am also a PhD candidate with my concentration in Adult Online Education.  I have been interested in the use of podcasting for quite a while now, hope to learn more. I believe that Adults learn differently than most students and the use of podcasting will add to the delivery of information. I have been transferring written documents to mp3 files and listening to them rather than reading. I find that I comprehend the article with much more clarity.

Great to me in this group.  

Allan

In reply to Richard Smith

Do we need a "what" as well as "why"?

by Alice MacGillivray -
Here is a definition from wikipedia; is there agreement on what podcasting is and isn't?  Would concrete examples/links of things that fit and don't fit the definition be useful for us novices?  How do the distinctive characteristics of podcasts fit [or not] with trends in education?
In reply to Alice MacGillivray

Introductions

by Betty Cunnin -

Hi everyone;

My name is Betty Cunnin.  I teach Horticulture in Langley BC and am interested in using a podcast tutorial to enhance plant identification instruction.  I am developing a podcast design as a course project for my MEd in Education Technology .  I am new to the EdTech biz, mostly having my hands in the dirt rather than on the keyboard, but did attend the Podcast camp here and am beginning to see there are educatioanal advantages to technology beyond the access issue.  Esp. when it comes to  skill practice.

Betty

 

 

 

In reply to Betty Cunnin

Re: Introductions

by Richard Smith -
Imagine a podcast in which the plants are featured with pictures, and your tips/advice/warnings about them are the audio accompanying them. And, because they are chapters, and you put them in alphabetical order (perhaps simply by creating a powerpoint presentation with a flower/plant on each slide, in alphabetical order, and using profcast to record that), people can scroll throught them using the thumbwheel on their iPod. Can you see a guidebook in the works? Now, imagine a version of this in a few years time in which people can *record* annotations or feedback, attach those to the chapters, and upload those to a merged RSS feed...

There is already a slick little first aid podcast, with a separate item for each little emergency. Not that I look forward to the person leaning over me (perhaps I have slipped on the path, while listening to your horticulture guide in the woods...) and saying... "hang on, I think the batteries are gone in my iPod... I'm not sure how to treat that!"

Welcome to the discussion.

..r
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Heather Ross -
Wow, I read this and my head started spinning with the possibilities.

Can you plese point us towards the first aid podcast?

H.
In reply to Heather Ross

Re: Introductions

by Richard Smith -
I seem to have deleted it from my computer, but if you go to iTunes and click on "Podcasts" and then "Health" you'll see many, many examples.

Quite a few are about sex, and I am all for sexual health, but that's probably not what you're looking for in terms of first aid.

Ah, never mind... I tried using the "search" function and found one. It isn't the one I saw earlier - this one is from st johns ambulance - but it is pretty good.

http://www.sja.org.uk/iFirstAid/

...r
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by Bronwyn Stuckey -
Hi Bronwyn Stuckey here in sunny Sydney Australia. Late introducing myself :-( but I have been reading along .  I work as a consultant these days and visiting scholar. I am involved in a number of online learning and research projects that use Web2.0 tools and in some areas podcasting. I am always keen to expand my ideas on using these tools in ways that truly benefit the learners and learning.
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions

by David Millar -
I moved to Montreal about 5 months ago, at age 69 have no teaching gigs at present, am up to my neck in a "wired city" project called Ile sans Fil and a proposed website Voix de Montreal/Voices of Montreal which may include podcasts. See below in English and French.

Alice McGillivray's remarks inspired me to do a sort of web-bibliography which I have just posted under "possibilities of podcasts"; query to Richard Smith: could this be made into a wiki as Sylvia Currie did in a previous SCOPE seminar, so everyone can add to it?

My own career includes 10 years at NFB and leading a number of oral history projects across Canada. Since 1970 I have been an oral historian and professor of history, now in retirement.

Voix de Montréal see English below

Le site consistera d’histoires de vie, auxquelles pourraient s’ajouter musique, podcasts, et vlogs.

Le format sera multiculturel, avec pages écrites dans les deux langues officielles, voire peut-être une 3e, soit la langue d’origine. Nous espérons que divers groupes provenant des communautés culturelles nous recommandront des contacts. Pour débuter, il en faudrait quelques douzaines.

Le projet sera nécessairement un travail de collaboration. On cherche l’appui de journalistes débutants, aussi bien que de jeunes et d’aînés des communautés culturelles.

Déontologie: Chaque personne enrégistrée pourra raconter sa vie sans interruption. Afin de pouvoir  s’exprimer plus largement, on lui suggérera de détailler ses souvenirs d’enfance  y compris les souvenirs  olfactifs, visuels et sonores. Par la suite, on lui donnera une transcription, ou un playback dans la langue de l’entretien, afin qu’elle consente de manière informée à sa présentation publique. Les modalités d’enregistrement, de transcription, du travail collaboratif, et de diffusion sont à discuter. Quelques ébauches ont été préparées.

David Millar, ancien cinéaste et professeur d’histoire, maintenant à la retraite, a géré bon nombre de projets d’histoire orale à travers le Canada depuis 40 ans. Entre autres il a pris contact avec: Ile sans Fil, Matt Forsythe de Parole citoyenne / CitizenSHIFT de l’ONF, Hugh McGuire de Librivox, Public History et l’Institut de Développement Communautaire de l’université Concordia (Ronald Rudin, Stephen High, Elizabeth Hunt, Geraldo Sierra) et CHOQ-FM à l’UQAM.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Voices of Montreal

The website’s basic format would be multilingual life stories, including music, podcasts and vlogs -- from Montrealers of all origins. The webpages would have transcriptions in English and French, and the original language if possible. We hope that people will be proposed by their own ethnic communities. My past experience as an oral historian shows that once people recount a significant childhood memory with its associated sights, sounds, and smells, they find it easy to tell their story. We plan to train young journalists, teenagers and elders in various communities to join the interviewing team, since several dozen interviews will be required to give substance to the website, and attract further storytellers.

 

Ethics of informed consent: The interviewees are allowed to tell their story in their own way, with as little interruption as possible. Follow-up questions may come at the end. A transcription or playback will be given to the person, allowing them to judge whether they have told the story fully and accurately before signing a release for its public use. In past projects, I have found this creates trust and ensures fully-detailed stories. Interviewees do not feel they have to censor what they are saying, and are satisfied that “you have let me tell the whole story, my way”.

 

Methods of recording and transciption, principles of collaboration and publication, will be open to input from team members. Several drafts have been prepared for discussion.

In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions - a blushing latecomer

by Susanne Nyrop -
Hi Scope folks,

one good thing about being subscribed to everything going on here at Scope it the opportunity to be just lazily, vicariously learning tom the examples of others, a sort of active reading along, also known with the negative term lurking.

Anyway, just to show my benevolent but absent presence (if this can exist in teh same sentgence), here I am. Sus Nyrop, free lance agent up north of Copenhagen in Denmark, busy for the past decade doing all sorts of multimedia and online education experiments, especially in the field of teachers' professional  professional development.

Today I just started as a student in the Webcast Academy class 1.3 with a dozen other around the world, with Jeff Lebow from Worldbridges. Webcasts are supposed to happen live synchronously streamed online, and then edited and posted as podcasts, which demands multiple skills (all of which I am not sure I'll be able to learn yet, but I'll do my best to become part of a good team).  These skills are technical tool oriented as well as collaborative, social moderation skills.

Well  - all that I know to do on my own, until now, was simple samples recorded in Odeo, podomatic and Vimeo. Plus a natural tendency to use Skype fpr one-on - one calls,  as well as for conferences. And earlier work with multimedia editing of audio and video. I'm no novice but still with a humbe attitude towards new programs to manage. Audacity, Virtual Audio Cable, uploading via iTunes, using drupal for our asynchronous course communication, and text writing. Anyway, webcast academy seem to be a good start to  overcome the problems and find collegial peer support, and we do have a fine group I think.

http://webcastacademy.net
http://worldbridges.net

Why am I sharing this last minute?  I think perhaps as a reply to the welcome message that Richard recorded ans posted for newcomers (in another thread)

Happy to be with you even when just in silent mode, so many good tips and a lively discussion too. Just sorry I came in too late. Good to know I can come back to read more, thanks to Richard, Sylvia and the rest of you Scope folks.


In reply to Susanne Nyrop

Re: Introductions - a blushing latecomer

by Richard Smith -
Welcome Sus. I wonder if we might extend this discussion another few days (we're supposed to end today), to get a few more of the shrinking violets in from the cold...

Any other lurkers willing to share?

...r
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions - a blushing latecomer

by Bruce Smith -
Hello Everyone,

Yes, another lurker! But I'm not sure how much of value I have to share with an experienced group.

I am interested in podcasting in relation to two specific things that I do. I deliver professional development workshops -- in conflict resolution, public participation, and collaboration leading to consensus. I have been thinking about incorporating podcasts as introductory messages to folks who have registered to these sessions. I have also been wondering about using podcasts to make available specific pre-workshop content that might be of interest to some participants.

The second area of interest is as a supplement to asynchronous linear discussion on a bulletin board. Most of my facilitation work is face-to-face, but I also bring groups online to discuss specific topics, to stay in touch between infrequent meetings, or to reach across a a wide area. I have my own platform:
http://www.thinkwell.ca

I've been wondering about using podcasts to provide additional information within the discussion format, and to offer the opportunity for participants to make their participation more personal. The discussion about podcast as a vehicle for story telling has certainly given me things to think about!

I've been following the discussion and am going to try the method outlined by Richard in a post a few days ago -- recording in QuickTime Pro and converting to MP3 via iTunes. My main interest now is audio files. I found a detailed description of a QTP/iTunes process written by Tim Copeland at: http://www.99362.com/macnorthwest/

That's it for now. If the group decides to stay active for awhile I'll certainly continue to listen!

Thanks,

Bruce
In reply to Bruce Smith

Re: Introductions - a blushing latecomer

by Maggie Verster -

Hi Richard and all,

Yip, I am one of the serious lurkers. I have been skimming and scanning the posts as they come in but I need to seriously sit down and do a summary which I will post. I am on my way to my mountain retreat in Hogsback where I will hopefully have some time to:

- Do a summary so that I am in the loop completely

- Create a podcast (maybe on the the beauty of Hogsback.....)

If I manage to do this then....people...there is no stopping me....

So please Richard - you have to keep this discussion going.....

Maggie

Ps If you want to see the beauty of hogsback, see my pictures at http://www.flickr.com/photos/maggiev/sets/ and then....listen to the podcast....coming shortly.......

 

In reply to Maggie Verster

Re: Introductions - a blushing latecomer

by Richard Smith -
Hogs back sounds enticing.

Here's a suggestion (if you have a mac):

1. collect up a bunch of photos and make them a "slideshow" in powerpoint or keynote by sticking them in as one picture per page. Quit powerpoint/keynote

2. download and install profcast (http://www.profcast.com)

3. start keynote/powerpoint, open that set of slides

4. start profcast - it will recognize the open set of slides and assume you want to use that

5. check the recording input (either your headset or built in microphone or whatever you have) in the profcast settings

6. click the record button in profcast and it will put your slides into full screen mode

7. "narrate" the slides - tell us what the picture is, why you took it, what is important..

8. When you are done, press escape, and choose the "enhanced podcast" option.

9. profcast will save your images as files, save your audio, and then merge the two into a file, with an ".m4b" extension

10. come back here and click the "iTunesU" link that we have for this seminar (or if your file is small enough, you can upload it right into this forum). Upload the files.

11. come here and tell us if it worked...

...r
In reply to Richard Smith

Re: Introductions - a blushing latecomer

by Richard Smith -
If you don't want to jump around in this forum to find that iTunesU link:


http://www.sfu.ca/cgi-bin/itunesu

ID: scopeseminar
password: scopeseminar
In reply to Bruce Smith

Re: Introductions - a blushing latecomer

by Richard Smith -
Bruce raises an interesting question - what would *you* do with a podcast if you had one?

I tried something this past winter - using my digital camera in "movie" mode to make impromptu oral histories with my parents and their friends.

The theme I chose - old communication technologies - seemed appropriate, as pretty soon we won't have anyone arround who remembers sending or receiving a telegram or using a crank telephone.

What would YOU do with a podcast?

...r