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How can teamwork save lives?

How can teamwork save lives?

by Elena Felgar -
Number of replies: 5

Hello everyone,

I am bringing a draft discussion prompt from a previous FLO Design course project into this course.

I had drafted the learning prototype activity below, and from our conversations in this course thus far, I can see that the questions I drafted previously will likely fall flat and elicit responses that are repetitive.

In a separate post in this thread, I will attempt to redeem these questions!

[HOW, WHY, and FOR WHOM] 

I created this prompt as part of a course for healthcare providers who are learning the foundations of facilitating clinical simulation scenarios. The course highlights not only how simulation can be used as a tool for learning, but also on effective team functioning in a healthcare context. Teamwork and communication are the cornerstones of effective care, and these are developed through practice, debriefing and feedback during simulation. 

Because of the need to reduce F2F education, we are working on shifting the Simulation Learning Strategies course online, and this discussion prompt is 1 activity in the asynchronous learning component prior to a synchronous virtual session.

[ACTIVITY]

•Watch short simulation videos.
•Post response to reflection questions in discussion forum.
•Read other posts and reply to at least 1 other post


[REFLECTION QUESTIONS]

  • Consider how effective teamwork was demonstrated in the video? Which principles of effective teamwork (if any) were missing in the team response?
  • Think of a recent team response (e.g. code blue, deteriorating patient). What did you notice about the team’s response? What aspects of effective teamwork were or were not demonstrated?
  • Read other posts. Reflect on any additional insights regarding effective teamwork and how simulation can help with improving team dynamics. Post a response to these questions in the forum

thank you,
Elena

In reply to Elena Felgar

Re: How can teamwork save lives?

by Norma Sherret -

Hi Elena,

Your insights into your post and the context you provided about the learner audience made me think about "what, who, and when" with respect to discussion forum prompts.

I teach in Year 3 &4 in a $ year undergrad Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at a small college. Our students are with us for 4 years and we come to know each other very well in that time.

In terms of "what" is included in the discussion prompt seems to depend on supporting student learning outcomes and how  well our students know us as instructors and how well they know each other ("who"). Trust is a big issue with cohort groups and that brings me to "when". I will wait to get into juicer topics and be more provocative in my questions once I get a sense of who is in the course and what their contributions in early discussion have revealed about their existing knowledge, beliefs, values, etc.

For me, engaging students in online discussion forums is so contextual and therefore, so challenging!


In reply to Norma Sherret

Re: How can teamwork save lives?

by Elena Felgar -

Thank you, Norma, for the great point about the value of trust in the learning environment. I think I need to factor this in as the audience I will be engaging will not have had a prior connection with each other or with the facilitators. I need to consider how to lay a foundation of trust in this asynchronous learning environment. 

In reply to Elena Felgar

Re: How can teamwork save lives?

by Elena Felgar -

So here is my attempt at a draft discussion prompt (revised from above)...

Learners will be asked to watch a short (less than 5 min) video demonstrating a team response to a patient whose medical situation is deteriorating. They will then post a response to the discussion prompts in the forum.


[REFLECTION QUESTIONS]

Choose at least 1 of the questions below to respond to  

  1. What did you notice about how the team responded to the patient whose condition was deteriorating? If you were the patient or family member of a patient receiving care from the team, how confident would you feel in the team’s ability to work effectively and efficiently to coordinate and deliver care?
  2. Think of a recent team response you were involved in (either as a team lead or team member (e.g. code blue, deteriorating patient). Who and/or what actions were  responsible for the effectiveness in team response? What led to any gaps or errors in care? What does this indicate about the role of the team lead or team members?

Interested to hear feedback on how to make these more engaging and how to encourage dialogue among/between learners. 


Thank you!

In reply to Elena Felgar

Re: How can teamwork save lives?

by Melanie Chernoff -

Hi Elena,

I like the choice you offered your students to reply to one of two questions. I'm a big fan of reflective questions not only for the student who is replying, but for everyone else who chooses to read their responses. I find that this type of question provides for a more interesting read and the other students might actually spend more time reviewing each other's posts.

Melanie

In reply to Melanie Chernoff

Re: How can teamwork save lives?

by Elena Felgar -

Hi Melanie,

Thank you for the feedback. As a learner, I often feel more engaged and interested in participating when I am given some choice. This is particularly true when a discussion prompt doesn’t elicit a strong reaction from me. It feels hard to be genuine in a response when it doesn’t strike a chord and different questions may feel more relevant or meaningful to different learners. 


I agree that reflection is incredibly powerful and especially in a practice profession, this is where so much of the integration of learning happens. 

Thank you