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Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

by Nancy White -
Number of replies: 7

I am strongly influenced by this article: which resonates with my reluctance to formulaic tick the box, but I acknowledge I have to start somewhere! https://apihtawikosisan.com/2016/09/beyond-territorial-acknowledgments/

I acknowledge with both my gratitude and knowledge of my own ignorance that I live, work and exist on the ancestral lands of the many Coast Salish tribes. I am a settler with my family coming from Italy, Holland, Ireland and England and my relations are scattered across the US, Argentina, Taiwan and England. I am married into a family who came from Poland and England, the latter as an indentured servant who went on to own a plantation, likely with slaves. I acknowledge I am learning and I'm am grateful for the opportunity.


In reply to Nancy White

Re: Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

by Dianne Biin -

Thank you for starting Nancy.  I appreciate your humbleness in your acknowledgement. 

One of the things I remember for an acknowledgement is to try to be as specific to place as possible. However, as you begin your journey, acknowledging the linguistic family is a great place to start.

Here's a neat map from an art exhibit (perpetual salish) that shows the diversity of the communities within 'coast salish'. I use Deborah Reade's map as a visual example to focus on this area from the larger BC map of First Nations. I like Deborah's map as it doesn't give prominance to the territorial border, but shows the family connections across the salish sea down to the Columbia River.

http://uvac.uvic.ca/gallery/salishcurriculum/coast-salish-territories-maps/

In reply to Dianne Biin

Re: Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

by Nancy White -

Thanks, Dianne, and great to e-be with you again! 

We have been struggling with which Tribal lands we are actually on, and so far without guidance from someone from each of those Tribes, we still have work to do. The particular location in Seattle was apparently a place where many Tribes have been and met over the years, right on the shores of Lake Washington. Belonging is such a multifaceted word and concept. 

What has been liberating reading others' work is the share recognition that a lack of clarity about our own roots, how we identify as a race or as a citizen of a national entity obscures our belongingness to our past. And that acknowledgement is from and to each other both as individuals and as communities. Quite beautiful. And complex. I have more confidence for our meeting on the 28th and I have planned to ask not only for additional input and advice, but feedback.  Thanks again for the super timely opportunity.  I am writing this from the Swinomish lands on the verge of Skagit Bay. 

In reply to Nancy White

Re: Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

by Nancy White -

Following up on my research:

I had trouble on the Canadian site (closest I could come was ) https://www.firstvoices.com/explore/FV/sections/Data/Coast%20Salish/Halkomelem/Stz%E2%80%99uminus

So I kept looking.

The Puget Sound Salish tribes including the Puyallup, Snohomish, Muckleshoot, Snoqualmie, Nisqually, Skagit, Suquamish, Squaxin, Swinomish, Stillaguamish, and Sauk-Suiattle tribes.

So resources for language/pronunciation for these tribes would be Lushootseed  - http://www.native-languages.org/lushootseed.htm

Next I need to figure out which Tribes for the specific location of my meeting, or use a wider net. Since it is a state-wide meeting, should I consider the Tribes from other areas if we think of the state, or just focus on the geographic location?



In reply to Nancy White

Re: Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

by Dianne Biin -

Good question, start specific to the place of the meeting and then broaden to "coast salish" or "loshootseed speaking peoples". And you can always double check with Indigenous Peoples who are part of the meeting if you feel nervous.

I heard a great acknowledgement from a Burke Museum representative who recognized the tribes that had family and resources ties to what is now known as Puget Sound.  

Remember Nancy, for all of the tribes you mentioned, they are connected by family and language.

Have a great series of meetings!

In reply to Dianne Biin

Re: Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

by Nancy White -

Ooh, Dianne, I love that family and resource ties -- it also amplifies and echoes the work this collaborative network is doing around floodplains that emphasizes multi-benefit. Resonance! thank you again

In reply to Nancy White

Re: Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

by Susan Glynn-Morris -

Hi Nancy

I really appreciate the piece you included about the fact that you are "learning and grateful for the opportunity". I feel that there is real bravery in admitting that we are still learning and that it creates a space, and signals an openness, for conversation.

Thank you for sharing.

Sue 

In reply to Susan Glynn-Morris

Re: Nancy's Land Acknowledgement

by Nancy White -

Sue, what my Black friends, particularly my women friends, share with me is that I must dispense with my own white fragility. So there is this interesting edge between vulnerability AND not expecting my Aboriginal colleagues and friends to bear the burden of my ignorance, nor my shame at times, right? Interesting space for reflection. Thanks for taking the time to post your observations!