Creating Engaging Online Learning Activities: Aug 1-15, 2015

A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Sylvia Riessner -
Number of replies: 26

Framing Our Approach to Creating Engaging Online Learning Activities

I thought it might be useful to spend some time thinking and talking about what we believe motivates online learners.

I've read Daniel Pink's book Drive and watched his TED Talk (I've included the link in the Resources page - found in the current seminar tab.)  And I've read various journal articles over the years and textbook chapters on motivation. But I found these approaches too broad to be helpful for the focused approach Sylvia Currie and I talked about when we were throwing ideas around for this two week seminar.

SylviaC suggested taking a look at Elaine Khoo and Curtis Bonk's book Adding Some TEC-Variety,  which begins with a brief review of learning theory, philosophical perspectives about how people learn, and then focuses on what the research says about motivation and engagement in online learning.

I'm suggesting we start off from Chapter 3: Online Motivation From Four Perspectives. 

Do you agree with the 10 principles Bonk and Khoo developed based on their review of ideas about motivation and learning?

I encourage you to share any alternative viewpoints about motivation and engagement that you find useful.

Bonk, C.J. & Khoo, E. (2014).Online Motivation From Four Perspectives. In Adding Some TEC-VARIETY: 100+ Activities for Motivating and Retaining Learners Online. (pp.31-43) Retrieved from http://tec-variety.com/TEC-Variety_ch3.pdf.  You can download the complete book as a pdf; please consider purchasing the book if you find it valuable.

Chapter 3 presents the philosophical perspectives on learning and research on motivation that were used to develop the 10 principles that they suggest should be used to guide online learning activity design. These 10 principles are used to organize over 100 ideas for online learning activities.


In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by tony cairns -

Do you agree with the 10 principles Bonk and Khoo developed based on their review of ideas about motivation and learning?

 

Yes

 

Tell us a little about yourself and what you're hoping to learn/practice/build? Do you have an online learning activity (OLA) that you want to repurpose, improve, restructure? Or do you need to create something fresh to help students master a difficult concept or think critically about a journal article or video?

 

Hi i am tony cairns

i am studying how to make assessments more creative - and that's what I am focussing on for the first 2 weeks of august

 

and i would love any of you interested in assessmentsand how to make them more creative to fill out a 5 minute survey here for me please

My Survey is here

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/99CWJSW

My blog is here

my  PD is here

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BynJrjHmkHOLQTVwR1FpREpSWV9HTHNuRVAxWU1aTXpKUThn

my results are here

https://www.surveymonkey.com/analyze/DyP5m3Tm2SC8_2BiAAM3rUb_2B3Lk2sRoqfaoVd9bzpjObQ_3D

My sites are here

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

this is what i am doing at the moment

I am researching assessment and how to make more creative assessments for post grad work at Mindlab and Unitec
I spoke at LoopEd and WellyEd and hosted speakers and workshops at BiolIve ChemEd 2015
I am working with VUW and York Uni on Innovation in Science Investigation
I am working with HackGovNZ and MBIE on an app for alternatives to university called alt.uni under the Fill the Gap  brand
I am working with the bridge builders for Royal for extension and enrichment
I am working on the IdeaVolt App for Innovation in NZ Schools and i am developing a third app with the last startup of the year
I videoed 102 presentations for the BEANZ and ChemEd conferences in the hols and did a POGIL workshop
I wrote 4 research essays and 15 blogs for Unitec last fortnight and did anothe 6 essays and 24 videos for the digital and collaborative course 
I am doing the GATE workshops after school most terms and doing work with NZCER on Assessment And games (tho I need to do more on Gaming - Andrew is the expert on that)
I am applying for the CoreEd efellow Scholarship next year to do a masters on assessment via digital and collaborative learning - we are piloting online assessments with Academic perfect
I am speaking at uLearn in october and doing a presentation for the Permission to play stream na then attending the Research Stream
I attended a SOLO workshop, a Canterbury University Science Resources workshop and a Maurice Wilkins Biology Workshop
I am doing tech stuff with several businesses and attending all the Core Workshop breakfast seminars.
I do mainly virtual or digital webinars, mOOCs and edchatnz, edchat, (Oz) scichatnz, and 37 VPN and 54 google groups for learning and i run a couple of google groups for learning and follow another 50+
I attend most of the library events at school and most of the Royal Society Teacher science Events, the Capital Science Educators group, most BEANZ, VUW and Zealandia and Zoo Biology events
I go to the Maurice Wilkins Centre, Liggins, Alan Wilson Centre and Malaghan and Callaghan Science Teacher events. I attend to support but not to coach the IYPT and IYPT and Science fair events
There are other things and courses and stuff i am doing but I forget - i just do them, shoot them, upload and archive them
cheers and sorry about the rave above but its busy at mo
 
tony cairns

 

ps just seen Seymour about Bernstein by ethan hawke and these are the quotes i loved


"The most important thing that music teachers can do for their pupils is to inspire an emotional reaction, not just for the music, but more importantly, for life."


"The true essence of who we are resides in our talent - whatever talent we have."

"The people who don't want me to succeed for their own selfish reasons can't touch me."

"We sense in music a reflection of ourselves, a reminder of our own potential for perfection."

"I never dreamt that with my own two hands, I could touch the sky."

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/seymour_an_introduction/reviews/?type=user

 

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by tony cairns -

Do you agree with the 10 principles Bonk and Khoo developed based on their review of ideas about motivation and learning?

 

Yes, I agree with this

What motivates? Tone/Climate: Psychological Safety, Comfort, Sense of Belonging Encouragement: Feedback, Responsiveness, Praise, Supports Curiosity: Surprise, Intrigue, Unknowns Variety: Novelty, Fun, Fantasy Autonomy: Choice, Control, Flexibility, Opportunities Relevance: Meaningful, Authentic, Interesting Interactivity: Collaborative, Team-Based, Community Engagement: Effort, Involvement, Investment Tension: Challenge, Dissonance, Controversy Yielding Products: Goal Driven, Purposeful Vision, Ownership

 

but maybe a better question is How do we make this happen in our schools and learning environments and how do we balance the need for creativity and learning with assessment? or maybe i just think that is better because that is what i am looking at at the moment. I think the above list of words, actions and beliefs works well both online and off and the purpose of the teacher is to " inspire an emotional reaction, not just for the (learning), but more importantly, for life." Bernstein said music but i think it applies to any subject, course inquiry online and off

 

I am loading this intro a second time as the original disappeared into a swirl of error messages when i tried to edit it to correct spelling and typos so her's hoping and damn the typos i so wsh i could right click and spell and grammar check like all programmeshave done for me for the past decade but whatever

 

Tell us a little about yourself and what you're hoping to learn/practice/build? Do you have an online learning activity (OLA) that you want to repurpose, improve, restructure? Or do you need to create something fresh to help students master a difficult concept or think critically about a journal article or video?

 

Hi i am tony cairns

i am studying how to make assessments more creative - an thats wht i am focussing on fo the first 2 weeks of august

 

and i would love any of you interested in assessmentsand how to make them more creative to fill out a 5 minute survey here for me please

My Survey is here

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/99CWJSW

My blog is here

my  PD is here

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BynJrjHmkHOLQTVwR1FpREpSWV9HTHNuRVAxWU1aTXpKUThn

my results are here

https://www.surveymonkey.com/analyze/DyP5m3Tm2SC8_2BiAAM3rUb_2B3Lk2sRoqfaoVd9bzpjObQ_3D

My sites are here

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

this is what i am doing at the moment

I am researching assessment and how to make more creative assessments for post grad work at Mindlab and Unitec
I spoke at LoopEd and WellyEd and hosted speakers and workshops at BiolIve ChemEd 2015
I am working with VUW and York Uni on Innovation in Science Investigation
I am working with HackGovNZ and MBIE on an app for alternatives to university called alt.uni under the Fill the Gap  brand
I am working with the bridge builders for Royal for extension and enrichment
I am working on the IdeaVolt App for Innovation in NZ Schools and i am developing a third app with the last startup of the year
I videoed 102 presentations for the BEANZ and ChemEd conferences in the hols and did a POGIL workshop
I wrote 4 research essays and 15 blogs for Unitec last fortnight and did anothe 6 essays and 24 videos for the digital and collaborative course 
I am doing the GATE workshops after school most terms and doing work with NZCER on Assessment And games (tho I need to do more on Gaming - Andrew is the expert on that)
I am applying for the CoreEd efellow Scholarship next year to do a masters on assessment via digital and collaborative learning - we are piloting online assessments with Academic perfect
I am speaking at uLearn in october and doing a presentation for the Permission to play stream na then attending the Research Stream
I attended a SOLO workshop, a Canterbury University Science Resources workshop and a Maurice Wilkins Biology Workshop
I am doing tech stuff with several businesses and attending all the Core Workshop breakfast seminars.
I do mainly virtual or digital webinars, mOOCs and edchatnz, edchat, (Oz) scichatnz, and 37 VPN and 54 google groups for learning and i run a couple of google groups for learning and follow another 50+
I attend most of the library events at school and most of the Royal Society Teacher science Events, the Capital Science Educators group, most BEANZ, VUW and Zealandia and Zoo Biology events
I go to the Maurice Wilkins Centre, Liggins, Alan Wilson Centre and Malaghan and Callaghan Science Teacher events. I attend to support but not to coach the IYPT and IYPT and Science fair events
There are other things and courses and stuff i am doing but I forget - i just do them, shoot them, upload and archive them
cheers and sorry about the rave above but its busy at mo
 
tony cairns

 

ps just seen Seymour about Bernstein by ethan hawke and these are the quotes i loved


"The most important thing that music teachers can do for their pupils is to inspire an emotional reaction, not just for the music, but more importantly, for life."


"The true essence of who we are resides in our talent - whatever talent we have."

"The people who don't want me to succeed for their own selfish reasons can't touch me."

"We sense in music a reflection of ourselves, a reminder of our own potential for perfection."

"I never dreamt that with my own two hands, I could touch the sky."

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/seymour_an_introduction/reviews/?type=user

In reply to tony cairns

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Sylvia Riessner -

Sorry you had troubles posting Tony. I've explored a few of the links you shared and read your list of activities - you're certainly not afraid to take on new challenges. I hope you'll find this a good place to develop a new OLA around creative assessment.

BTW, I went to your survey but I can't complete it as I have no  knowledge of the NCEA assessments.

You agree with the principles put forward by Bonk and Khoo - do you have any thoughts about how they might relate to assessment? 

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Alice Macpherson -

The 10 principles Bonk and Khoo developed based on their review of ideas about motivation and learning:

  • Tone/Climate: Psychological Safety, Comfort, Sense of Belonging
  • Encouragement: Feedback, Responsiveness, Praise, Supports
  • Curiosity: Surprise, Intrigue, Unknowns
  • Variety: Novelty, Fun, Fantasy
  • Autonomy: Choice, Control, Flexibility, Opportunities
  • Relevance: Meaningful, Authentic, Interesting
  • Interactivity: Collaborative, Team-Based, Community
  • Engagement: Effort, Involvement, Investment
  • Tension: Challenge, Dissonance, Controversy
  • Yielding Products: Goal Driven, Purposeful Vision, Ownership

If this overview starts to answer the Where (Online), How (Categories), and Why (Theory and Research models) questions then the next questions that arise, for me, are:
Who (are the Learners)?
What (Actual Techniques linked to real learning objectives)?
When (Timing within the learning/teaching framework)?

All through this is the notion I have that learner motivation is always tied to the ongoing answer, to the satisfaction of the learner, “What is in this for Me?”

I will add that once techniques have been chosen, there is still the negotiation of how much of a framework does the teacher provide and what prerequisite skills does the learner need to proceed.

 This is thought provoking.

In reply to Alice Macpherson

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Sylvia Riessner -

I'm not sure that we will ever come to a comprehensive answer to the starting questions but talking about the why and how will help to focus and guide our practical activities in the next two weeks.

I'm glad you posed the next questions as I'm starting a new thread that includes the next steps: planning our online learning activities.

And I hope to come back to your last questions:  "how much of a framework does the teacher provide" and "what prerequisite skills does the learner need to proceed" after we begin to develop learning activities.

So much depends on what we believe about how people learn most effectively and what we think our students need to succeed (and what "success" means beyond a grade in a course).

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Viviana Chiorean -

Do you agree with the 10 principles Bonk and Khoo developed based on their review of ideas about motivation and learning?

I do agree with the ten principles developed, the most appealing to me being:

-Climate - Safety, belonging and the ideal high expectancy/low stakes environment.

-Autonomy - Choices, freedom and self-direction including self-motivation, self-monitoring and self-modifying to increase learning. 

-Relevance - How does the information fit into the learner's context? What is the immediate application beyond the lecture hall?

I have written a more extensive piece on motivation, which I will attach as well. I am always open to constructive criticism, in the process of lifelong learning!!

Viviana 

 

In reply to Viviana Chiorean

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Sylvia Riessner -

It would be interesting to poll students as to which principles appeal to them the most. I wonder how much the answers will be affected by their purpose or motivation as they begin a course and the knowledge and skills they bring to it?

If I put myself in the shoes of a learner, I think Relevance would be my primary interest. Perhaps Yielding Products would be the next and then the rest are "nice to haves, not need to haves". 

This might change for me as I moved through a course or learning experience - as I engage in learning, I'd value Climate, Encouragement, Curiosity, Variety.

I'll read your piece later today. Thanks for sharing Viviana.

In reply to Viviana Chiorean

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Curt Bonk -

Hi Viviana...you selected three important ones. The relevance and climate chapters are among the most downloaded as is autonomy. The other chapter that is downloaded a lot (perhaps the most) is the one on curiosity. The one on encouragement and feedback is important for those new to online and blended forms of learning.

Entire book: http://tec-variety.com/

By Chapter: http://tec-variety.com/freestuff.php 

Thanks for your reflection. This book was initially brainstormed back in 2000. I started collecting articles in 2007 and talking about it around 2005. It took 3 years of writing. Ug.

If you want to read a little story about this book, see:

Bonk, C. J. (2013, January 9). Adding Some TEC-VARIETY to Online Teaching and Learning, Cengage Learning Blog (http://blog.cengage.com/). Available: http://blog.cengage.com/?top_blog=adding-some-tec-variety-to-online-teaching-and-learning

In reply to Curt Bonk

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Viviana Chiorean -

Thank you Curt, 

I appreciate the time and research dedicated to this book, and will certainly leave a review once I have a more comprehensive read through it!!

Viviana 

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Curt Bonk -

Hello Sylvia and Everyone:

Thanks for reading and reflecting upon my little TEC-VARIETY book. As I mention in another post below, this project was long in the making. Too long. But ok. I decided to self-publish this one for many reasons. As you might imagine, there are many pros and cons to it. The main pros are the control over the process, the ability to buy the book cheaply and give it away to others, helping people who cannot afford other books, etc. The main cons are cost and people who might question the quality. We went through many quality control measures for this book--it had several reviewers and editors from Florida State and IU, a copyeditor from Portland, a proofreader from Portland, an indexer from Toronto, a graphic artist (my son who was in DC), a webmaster techie person (in Madison, Wisconsin), a researcher (here in Bloomington), and so on.

I can say that Amazon CreateSpace are some of the most polite and helpful people I have ever worked with. I highly recommend them if you self-publish. I have been told that Lightning Source is also a good option and perhaps has better royalties. https://www.lightningsource.com/. But I did not self-publish the book for royalties. I did it since my last publisher (Jossey-Bass) sent only 2 books to a conference in Manila, the Philippines for a conference of over 1,000 people. Worse, they charged 2-3 times USA prices. No one there could afford it. So I bought them and gave them away to the best questions asked after my keynote. And I promised everyone in the audience that my next book would be free to the world. And so it is.

So I am most delighted that nearly 60,000 people have downloaded the book since it came out a little over a year ago. Scholars at Beijing Normal University in China have recently translated it as a free e-Book in Chinese as well. Anyone can use, share, or download either version from the link below. It is also available in paperback and Kindle from Amazon. See book homepage for details: http://tec-variety.com/

http://tec-variety.com/TEC-VARIETY-Chinese.pdf 

I visited and spoke at Beijing Normal U at the end of June. Great people. I also visited the Open University of China (OUC) when in Beijing. They will make it available for print in Chinese. The OUC has over 3.5 million students. It is the second largest university in the world (the Open U of India being #1). It is my second book in Chinese. My 2009 book, The World is Open: How Web Technology is Revolutionizing Education is available in Chinese. Apparently, it is a best seller in China so I am pleased. I attach a picture with my publisher and translator (in red) below take at East China Normal University (ECNU) in Shanghai in mid June.

Here is a piece I wrote 2 years ago that recaps much of the Adding Some TEC-VARIETY book:

     Bonk, C. J. (2013, July). Adding some TEC-VARIETY to online courses.  Education Magazine, Issue 6, 15-20 (found at: itunes.apple.com: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/educationist-magazine-app/id593725339?ls=1&mt=8 available for Free at: http://www.publicationshare.com/Education_Mag_6_TEC-VARIETY.pdf). 

By the way, my newest book came out last month with Routledge. It is called "MOOCs and Open Education Around the World."  More on it is here including the free preface I wrote.

http://www.moocsbook.com/ (you can also learn more on this book from my top blog post and see pictures from my China trip right below that: http://travelinedman.blogspot.com/).

China South to North: Some Cool Looks, a Few Books, and a Building Named MOOCs

http://travelinedman.blogspot.com/2015/07/china-south-to-north-some-cool-looks.html

Enjoy your reflections. Remember reviews in Amazon are always welcome (http://www.amazon.com/dp/1496162722/). And I would love to get your feedback in an email. My email is cjbonk at Indiana.edu.

Best of luck creating more motivating online and blended courses and experiences..

In reply to Curt Bonk

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Dr. Nellie Deutsch -

Hi All,

I just bought Curt's MOOCs and Open Education Around the World because I got tired of waiting for him to send me a free signed copy as  he had in the past. Curt has great ideas on how to entertain us as we listen, watch, and hopefully retain some of the information. But then, how important is it to retain information, when it can be easily accessed online? Personally, I prefer the experience and Curt's talks provide me with many. For me, engaging with the information and coming up with new ways of using it is far more important.  

In reply to Dr. Nellie Deutsch

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Curt Bonk -

Ha ha ha Nellie. I never got your address this time. Thanks for buying it!

I have just started to send the international ones out but they are $30 per package for mailing + the book and the special issue = a very expensive package.

In reply to Curt Bonk

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Dr. Nellie Deutsch -

Curt, free downloads and sending out free books are wonderful gestures. I bought the book as a token of my appreciation. 

So, thank you for caring. 

In reply to Curt Bonk

Thanks for stopping in and sharing...

by Sylvia Riessner -

Wow, sounds like an incredible journey. Thanks for sharing and for stopping in this weekend. I'll definitely explore your new book and I'll submit a review of TEC-Variety as soon as this seminar is done.

I did a fair bit of searching around to see if anyone else had created similar frameworks and links to ideas and examples of learning activities to try. I couldn't find any that provided such a comprehensive collection. Your book provides  a useful and relevant approach to help us develop better online learning.

We'll let you know how it works out. 

Cheers

SylviaR

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Leonne Beebe -

Reviewing the ten points from Chapter 3, I chose

  • Tone/Climate: Psychological Safety, Comfort, Sense of Belonging
  • Encouragement: Feedback, Responsiveness, Praise, Supports
  • Curiosity: Surprise, Intrigue, Unknowns
  • Variety: Novelty, Fun, Fantasy
  • Autonomy: Choice, Control, Flexibility, Opportunities
  • Relevance: Meaningful, Authentic, Interesting
  • Interactivity: Collaborative, Team-Based, Community
  • Engagement: Effort, Involvement, Investment
  • Tension: Challenge, Dissonance, Controversy
  • Yielding Products: Goal Driven, Purposeful Vision, Ownership

Interestingly, while choosing as a teacher and student, I found that what I wanted as a student does influence what I want to provide as a teacher for my students.  I chose four points, but what if my teachers or my students choose from the other six points instead? What if my students don't want as students what I want as a student and therefore what I want as a teacher? Or, what if my teacher doesn't want as a teacher what I want as a student?

I want to learn relevant, new information, and I want to be able to self-direct and self-assess my learning progress, so I am interested in designing a study skills rubric to go with a set of review and reflect guided questions to provide my students with a learning journal as a means to self-direct and self-assess their learning progress. But, what if my students don't want this support?

Out of confusion comes clarity,

Leonne

 

 

 

In reply to Leonne Beebe

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Curt Bonk -

Hi Leonne...

Great questions. I think if you use 3 or 4 or 5 of the 10, you will have a more successful classroom.

Now as to your question, what if student motivators do not match instructor selections...what an insightful question. No one has asked me this before. I do not have an answer to that. Perhaps it is negotiated. Perhaps it is decided as you go. Perhaps the instructor decides early on cedes control to the students later on. Perhaps you just run it as you like and change it next time. I like that last idea. Stay true to yourself and your preferences and try it. Change it later if not.

curt

In reply to Curt Bonk

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Sue Hellman -

Hi all,

Sorry to be late to the party ... & to start I'm browsing the discussions and adding a few thoughts. Here are my thoughts on Curt's response to Leonna's question:

I think with online learning it's important to be aware of the spectrum of 'motivators' or 'engagers'. I found an article at http://lackawannaschools.org/cms/lib/NY19000337/Centricity/ModuleInstance/865/TheEight_Cs_of_Engagement.pdf (much of which I don't agree with or find useful) that gives an interesting way to categorize these (see table on page 9). What I think engaging e-learning does is provide engagers from all categories over the course of a lesson so that every learner at some point is drawn in and none are turned off by an over-reliance on any one strategy. Also providing choices of whether to participate in gaming, badging, and so forth is important. One does this on the fly in smaller f2f classes where one gets to know the students and can adapt or personalize by offering options and suggestions. But in e-learning, many learners start by browsing (as i'm doing with this course) -- looking for points of connection which pique interest and give them a sense that there's something there for them so the more different kinds of lure (strategies) you use, the more fish you'll catch. Once the course is over, asking for feedback about what they did/not find engaging can help you fine tune later iterations. Then you can choose to add, change, delete, or leave as is even if the feedback is negative. Adding some explanation of why you've made that choice & how it is necessary for or will enhance understanding can go a long way in those situations. Students like to know their feedback has been heard and acted upon in some way. They find that highly engaging ! :-)

In reply to Leonne Beebe

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Judi Piggott -

Leonne, you have definitely hit on a key point that I've had swirling around my brain today, along with some thoughts about DEmotivators. So, yes, based on my own reflecting back over the course of 60+ years as a learner, my interests, needs, wants, motivators, health, patience - ALL have shifted and ebbed and flowed, so that choosing from the list is difficult without knowing other variables. All the more reason to know your students, something perhaps less possible for an online course. 

I suppose it is like marketing: create personas of your most likely participant with the greatest need for what you have to offer and work out from there. Get out of yourself and into their minds, that has to be a useful frame for all design considerations. I'll have to keep ruminating on this.

As for demotivation, I found when I was teaching interviewing and placement skills to volunteer coordinators, and thus using the research about motivation in the course material, that including Herzberg's two-factor theory overlapping Mazlow's hierarchy of needs made great sense. It can sometimes take very little to deflate a person's hope, curiosity, or belief in themselves, regardless of how many motivational tools one has designed into a process. I can say from my own experience that this can apply in the learning realm, not just the workplace.

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by Carlos Ortiz -

Dear Sylvia and all.

The video and readings have been very interesting and enriching. Although I have to confess I thought the speaker was a bit too fast on the video, so I had to watch it twice. I could follow the reading in a more relaxed way.

I tottally agree motivation is the key for any learning, and all the models proposed are very smart. The idea of integrating all the components in a sensible way as proposed by Reeves sounds so reasonable and logic to me.

From my personal experience I can tell sociocultural factors are the most relevant, but I have also realised that in all cases, intrinsical motivation is the key of success in any learning. I many cases, no matter how hard you try and how many strategies are used, they won't work if there is not a very strongand deep personal reason for the learner to meet the challenge of learning.

Of course I don't mean that with already self motivated students,I can't get even better results by using these considerations and strategies when preparing acivities for the courses. Nobody wants o prefers silly or boring activities no matter how self motivated students can be..

That's why I'm here, ready to learn from all of you and be guided into this asolutely relevant topic in learning.

Best regards

Regards

In reply to Carlos Ortiz

Words to Remind Us

by Sylvia Riessner -

I pulled together a quick Wordle of the terms about motivation we shared in this discussion thread. I'm going to print it and post it on my bulletin board to keep in mind as I develop my online learning activity. 

Motivation

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: Words to Remind Us

by tony cairns -

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/15K9CpSfTrclYDnG-mo1Af7P-EbGOb-fvZ-yP8KlsfsI/edit?usp=sharing

I am just analysing my survey n=427 from students, parents and teachers on how to be nore creative in teaching and learning - here's the top 6 ideas and top 31 and the survey that created the data https://www.surveymonkey.com/analyze/DyP5m3Tm2SC8_2BiAAM3rUb4v9oc8SLOOrY7TMVCOMKas_3D

If autonomy be student choice

interactivity be collaborative learning

relevance is relevance

 

etc

 

 

Improvement (top 6) Number %
More Relevant 38 23%
Student Choices 34 21%
Student Collaboration 20 12%
Flexible assessments 29 18%
Portfolios 30 18%
Cross-curricular projects 12 7%
  163

100%

Improvement (top 31) Number %
Student Choices 21 11%
More Relevant 19 10%
Real world application 14 7%
Flexibility 13 7%
Collaboration 12 6%
Practical work 10 5%
Personalized learning 9 5%
Portfolios 9 5%
Group Work 8 4%
More choices 7 4%
Less Writing 6 3%
More time for teaching 5 3%
Problem solving 5 3%
Context 5 3%
Cross-curricular projects 5 3%
Technology 5 3%
Assessment on demand 4 2%
Project based 4 2%
Business links 3 2%
Internals 3 2%
Integration 3 2%
Longer time for assessments 3 2%
Presentations 2 1%
More teacher prep time 2 1%
Learning not just credits 2 1%
Interesting topics 2 1%
Enjoyable Learning 2 1%
More learning - less credits 2 1%
Extra-curricula credits 2 1%
Science fair credits 2 1%
Micro accreditation 1 1%
  190 100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In reply to tony cairns

Re: Words to Remind Us

by Maria Droujkova -

How interesting, Tony!

Can you please link the survey itself (not the editing page, which requires your password)?

Once I surveyed a much smaller group of children and their parents with just one question, "What helps you do better mathematics?" Number one was food, number two pets, number three being with people OR not being with people ("my mom near me, my brother nowhere near me"). 

It made me humble about my assumptions of what's important. 

In reply to tony cairns

Re: Words to Remind Us

by Leonne Beebe -

Hi Tony,

These are interesting results.  Relevancy and flexible assessment do seem to be important factors to consider.

I see you have used Survey Monkey for your project.  My Research Ethics Board advised me to use Fluid Survey, the Canadian version of Survey Monkey, for privacy issues. The Canadian content stays in Canada, even though the two companies have now merged.  The American version's content is accessible to their Homeland Security, so some people are reluctant to answer these surveys.

Leonne

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: A Starting Point: Framing Our Approach

by tony cairns -

sorry there seems to be a lag on the system

which means that the error messages

are incorrect 

and the message has loaded

sorry tony

In reply to tony cairns

Re: duplicate posts

by Sylvia Currie -

Sorry about all the duplicate posts, folks! We'll delete the extras. 

SylviaC