Digital Badges - Dec 1-15, 2012

TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Peter Rawsthorne -
Number of replies: 18

Task 3: Identifying the curriculum

5. Identify the completion criteria for any badge you have earned (traditional or digital).
Did you have to complete a series of tasks? Did you have to prove mastery of a skill? How was the mastery described? Was the badge knowledge based, how was the knowledge domain described as a learning criteria?

6. Describe a hierarchy or network of badges.
Does a single badge stand on its own or is it best associated with other badges? Do badges cluster in and around knowledge domains? Do badges exists in hierarchies or networks or both? What other patterns can an collection of badges exist? Should we consider the idea of micro-badges which lead toward (or collectively become) a badge? What issues could you see arising from micro-badges?

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Wayne Mackintosh -

The WIkiEducator community-based "Wikimaster" typology uses a competency-based framework where a learner who opts for a badge must demonstrate mastery of a range of wiki editing skills which increase in level of difficulty for higher level badges. 

There are clear criteria set for each level as well as corresponding open support resources to achieve each level, for example:

In this example, the badges exist in a hierarchy where the lower level is a pre-requisite for the next level badge. Of course, there will be other systems, where badges could be earned in parallel without a hierarchical structure. 

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by John Dumbrille -

5. In my knots badge for cubs ( not scouts as I imagined earlier) I had to show I could tie a number of standard knots - half hitch, sheep bend, clove and two half hitches etc. Accreditation was based on the knot looking like the pictures. The knowedge domain was general - anywhere you need a knot, although boats were mentioned alot. The badge was knowedge and action based (applied - you had to do the knots).

6. At my work we want to certify people for competence in running a call center using our software. There are a series of badges we imagine needing. First, we need an operator badge; then, once we are happy we can adequately teach others to transfer what we transfer to the call center trainees, trainer badges. 

As a requirements engineer, I encountered micro qualifications that lead to a complete qaulificaiton: in airline safety for cabin crew, you need HAZMAT, first aid, and 4 or 5 other passed courses to trigger a qualification to do a job. We had to model these qualifications and traingin events, and developed constraints based on any failure or non completion. Are the micro qualifications in need of badges to show outsiders? probably not in this case. For internal purposes, micro qualifications need to be tracked, but from an outside perspective what really matters is am I fully qualified - have I met completion criteria. Thats something that means more to people as it establishes identity.

In reply to John Dumbrille

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Peter Rawsthorne -

John and others,

I am very interested in the idea and purpose of the micro-badge. How the micro-badge contributes to the earning of the badge. And it is the badge that is displayed and the micro-badge sits in a "private" repository or is only accessed when someone explores the criteria of a badge. I also like how the micro-badge could be used cross-curricular... the idea being I earn a micro-badge on stage lighting for my band on tour badge, this micro-badge on lighting could also be used for a interior decoration badge or the stage craft badge.

I also think their is huge possibility of micro-badges within learning analytics, particularly in assisting in monitoring a students progress within the MOOC. Another discussion for another time...

Are we having fun yet?

Peter

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Pat Tymchatyn -

I talked about the Toastmasters system and so I will continue here.  You have to complete 10 speeches for the first level.  In the new system you have to complete two different manuals - one with speeches and one with activities related to speaking ex. evaluating a speech, chairing a meeting, being a parliamentarian  The participant chooses when to do what activity and there is no time limit so some people finish the first level in a year others may take three levels it all has to do with their commitment and confidence.

Personally I like the hierarchy level to show that there has been progress in ones knowledge.  I could relate to the "Seven Degrees of Connectedness" at Stage 3 and sometimes Stage 2 Novice but at least I see progress in my social media knowledge.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by David Porter -

5. Identify the completion criteria for any badge you have earned (traditional or digital).

PIT badge

For my Passport in Time badge, it really was about active participation and demonstration of a minimal set off skills associated with the various activities that take place on an archeological site: surveying, mapping, recording (photos, illustrations, GPS, site details and features, artifact details and features).

Mentorship is a big part of the program, with volunteers and professionals mentoring newcomers or those with prerequisite skills to learn current methods and techniques.

Most people on projects either had a background in archaeology or history, or some parallel discipline in science.

It was more informal than formal. 

6. Describe a hierarchy or network of badges.
I like the idea of a network of badges, 2-3 that work in a particular area of skill and note particular levels or specializations.  

In the case cited, it would surely have made the work of regional archaeologits a lot easier to know who to recruit based on the balance of skills needed for various projects.  I hate doing excavations (digs) becaues it's messy, dirty and largely stationary work.  My skills are in surveying, mapping and recording and I do my own recon on advertised projects to see which ones would likely suit my skills and interests.  As a result, I usally find myself surveying rock art sites or hunting sites in the mountains, rather than digging and sifting at river or lakeside camps.

In this case badges could be used both for advertising to and recruiting participants.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Leah Marie -

So, I'm going with a broad definition of badges to include certificates of completion. For example: I'm imagining that a badge could be awarded to students who attend all of our college's Writing Center Workshops. I know that I've received "certificates" for attending certain professional development workshops. I never had to prove my knowledge for these certificates, but taken together, they do paint a picture of my professional interests.

Also, I think that the question of whether badges should cluster or stand on their own is very situation-dependent. I think that badges can have different goals, and these goals should help you determine how granular they should go. Perhaps bigger learning tasks should be broken down into small badges, but this is not practical for a quick, one-shot learning task. I really think these issues are still in the developing-best-practices stage.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum K12

by Verena Roberts -

Last week, I attempted to pilot the first open online course for The OC@ADLC (The Open Classroom). We had 8 students and 10 + Facilitators and huge learning was had by all.

Badge Assessment for #BEFA12 (Beyond Facebook 12)
https://theopenclassroomadlc.instructure.com/courses/8715/wiki/badges-and-credit

Activity Rubrics and Competency Framework:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RUH1M1Pj2__IhH_6vtRNbmFikgh8C8WcFn7qw0WhQ24/edit#heading=h.fy76nkpvn8h

I chose to make the rubric one level (task focused) because I didn’t want a mark involved.

The students will complete two badges. Once they have attained both badges, they will be offered the one credit CTS 1250 Course.

Of the 8 students in the course, I have only received the framework for one student, yet all the students completed the activities. This is something I will need to think about for the future - what if they never do the framework?

Tracking the students.....
http://www.netvibes.com/verenanzoc#General

The OC@ADLC will offer all courses/projects based on badges. Not all badges will be able to offer credit - so I am invesitgating many of the options the other participants in the course have suggested.  That’s why I’m taking this course, because I already have different ways to approach our “badge” system. Thank You!

We will be “hosting” our badges based on our ADLC website. I will have to see how that can work with Mozilla.

Thanks,
Verena :)

In reply to Verena Roberts

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum K12

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Verena!

I like the approach. I have sometimes used rubrics as a part of assessment / self-assessment... I often find getting participants to understand the idea of a rubric and how it works is also a part of the learning curve. I have more than once turned rubric completion into a fun activity where we do them as part of the coursework. Even have the participants make thier own rubric, really get the idea of how they work. I don't know if this was the case with your cohort.

What I find interesting about this is it kicks of the idea of a micro-badge. Maybe you need to issue a bunch of small accomplishment badges that, if all earned, leads to a full badge. I know the Mozilla Open Badges Infrastructure is considering this approach...

Thanks for speaking up... fun looking project! Being critical about blogging is a great topic!

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum K12

by Verena Roberts -

Thanks Peter - This course has really helped me think about different options for badges, many badges can be pulled together to gain one big badge (possible credit)....The competency part and rubrics need some work. I agree - I woudl prefer that the students create their own rubrics. I ahve yet to create the #BEFA13 course, the "activity" will be creating a blog by themselves and tracking it...topic has to be one of the topics covered in the "credit" course....The students could make their own rubric for that one....

Thanks for the feeback..I have also decided, since yesterday(how thinsg change), that we are NOT going to "host" the badges in any way shape or form, we will work with Mozilla and focus towards what Purdue is doing....Thanks for the great session yesterday...lots of ideas!

Verena :)

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Paddy Fahrni -

5. Identify the completion criteria for any badge you have earned (traditional or digital).

My Brownie badge was earned by meeting task-based criteria set by org and described in a manual.  I did the task at home and a parent signed a form.

Several years back, I completed a 'Moodle Course Creator Certificate' (competency-based demo and exam) and thought it cool that I could simply quote the cert and number on resume and it was linked to moodle.org database (verification). Sort of a pre-badge thing - I wonder if they have moved to badges now?

6. Describe a hierarchy or network of badges.

Consider this story from the construction trades:
If you've ever worked in construction you know how the worksite can be crazy with a lot of different crews running around, a lot of noise and action. You also know safety is the top concern - right up there with time and money. SO here's a badge parallel:

The new guy has to wear a green hard hat/ or a green sticker on the hat. After the site safety officer says  (combo of time and competent behaviour), the guy gets another colour sticker. The experienced guys don't have to wear any stickers.

I'm working with construction workers now, and those who don't have jobs would be really happy to have the green sticker hat, because it would show they were accepted onto the crew. Then, they would be happy to get the next colour because it would show others they met expectations. Finally, I'd guess they would be happy not to have to have any sticker on their hat because  it showed they were higher level, experienced guys.

So this is a sequential hierarchy in one domain. And the 'badges' play an important external role (safety risk identification) as well as being intrinsic motivators.

In considering the questions, I come up with different answers depending on whether the badge speaks of external achievement/credential/ participation (probably hierarchical and clustered) or simply of the learning and engagement of the badge holder (networks, micro-badges, design choice). 

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Sylvia Riessner -

5. Identify the completion criteria for any badge you have earned (traditional or digital).
I will share Dr. David Wiley's approach in the open course I tried to complete last year "Introduction to Openness in Education". I still learned a great deal (and still refer to his open course pages) but I didn't earn the badges.  

I would have had to complete a different series of tasks for each level of badge - four badges possible - badges are potentially cumulative (see "Earning Course Badges" page for further explanation)

1. Novice (equivalent to a D grade)

- watch video(s) and skim readings and create a short blog post for each of 12 readings

- write a summative blog post linking all 12 topics

2.  OpenEd Researcher (Apprentice level - C grade)

- complete all the badge tasks listed for 3 of the 12 topics

- review readings & videos

- find 3 additional scholarly resources and write blog post summarizing

Write a blog post proposing a research study by which key assumptions of the topic could be (in)validated.(I love this one!)

- write a final blog post linking to your previous postings

3.  OpenEd Assessment Designer (Apprentice level - B grade)

- complete for one topic 

Design a badge for the class, including a name, expertise level, and statement of work - complete the work yourself!

- Blog about your proposed badge and explain how it should work. Include your completed badge as an example.

- Monitor class hashtags to see if someone completes your badge tasks and then assess their work and award them the badge - this will earn you your Apprentice badge but there's one more task!

-  Write a final blog post linking to previous blog posts

4.  OpenEd Evangelist (Journeyman level - A grade)

- Write a blog post containing 5 elements (evidence with references) that will convince someone to adopt opened as an ongoing practice.

-  Test your argument on a faculty member (face to face) and write a blog post about your discussion (protecting the identity of the member)

6. Describe a hierarchy or network of badges.
See above!  The simple graphics for the badges are from the Iconic collection of CC licensed art and are displayed on the explanatory page.

If he runs it again, I'll be there! It's a great overview of "open" history, intent, philosophies, sustainability, economic models, etc.

Sylvia

In reply to Sylvia Riessner

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Sylvia,

I lurked upon that course with Dr. Wiley. And I harvested some of his ideas around manually implementing badges... also like his badge widget hack.

What particulalry stood out for me from this course was how Dr. Wiley provided his students the option to create their own badge criteria and then execute... essentially allowing for the self-directed learner approach. I really see this as the modern master / apprentice model, and I hold out great hope it will become increasingly adopted...

I wrote a blog post about this during this summer; http://criticaltechnology.blogspot.ca/2012/06/open-badges-evidence.html

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Mostly I agree with each situation is different and the structure of the badge system will need to adjust and the people responsible for the design will have to tune it through time... I also like the idea of people developing there own curriculum... with assistance of course.

This seems to be the case for those moving into their second or third iteration of issuing a collection of badges; http://www.slideshare.net/halavais/eld12-badge-design - I like this slideshare from Alex Halavais for it gets into his experience with implementing badges in academia and at the 14 minute mark of the presentation gets into the chunkiness of badges...

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Margot Croft -

Alas, I don't have a clear memory of what was involved in my badges other than completing a series of tasks successfully--and that success was likely fairly subjective.  I've also used badges for an identifier--rather like the worksite badges worn on hard hats.

Am thinking of community-based social marketing technique and how recycling was increased through public demonstration of a pledge to engage in target recycling behaviours by putting a sticker on bins left out for garbage/recycling.  As that sticker (badge) was a public, enduring statement, the behaviours were more persistent, and encouraged others on the block to join in as the sticker also represented socially acceptable behaviour.  Am wondering if digital badges could have similar results in fostering sustainable behaviours.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Mary Burgess -

Some interesting badge experiences!  

Many years ago, I studied for and wrote exams that led to Microsoft certifications. I can't quite remember, but I think if you wrote 4, you were an MCP (Microsoft Certified Professional) or 6 to be an MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer). This experience, and my understanding of the way this set of "badges" still works (you get to put a little image of your cert in your email signature and elsewhere) is one of my major concerns about wide badge adoption as a way of showing competency to employers and others. There were test prep resources galore, and many people only used those resources rather than actually learning the skills needed to do the job of managing servers etc, the intended outcome. The certification was awarded based on a score on a multiple choice exam. There was no opportunity for authentic assessment of any kind, and the reputation of the cert has suffered as a result. 

I think the idea of rubrics or other forms of clear assessment criteria would be very helpful for potential employers for example, who might not trust that a badge = competency.

That all said, I found this article last night, https://wiki.mozilla.org/images/5/59/OpenBadges-Working-Paper_012312.pdf and found the discussion of capturing the learning path fascinating. 

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Jenny Mackness -

Sorry - I'm struggling to catch up here and maybe this has already been discussed - but what counts as a badge?

So does my MA count as a badge, or is it the assignments that I did for the MA that count as badges. Or is the the number of open online courses/seminars I attend?

For me there is a huge difference between these two and there are numerous other possible examples. If badges are only awarded for non-university accredited courses, how will they be 'recognised' - or is this not the point?

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 3 (Dec 4th): Identify the curriculum

by Julia Hengstler -

My first badges were in Girl Scouts (grew up in the States). If I recall correctly, they were skills and performance based where the group leader determined if I had completed the tasks necessary to obtain the badge. Those tasks were clearly defined by the Girl Scout organization.

More recently my kids achieved their Master Magi badges--a pin and status --awarded in the MagiQuest game at Great Wolf Lodge.The database records their achievements via some technology embedded in a wand. I'm guessing it's some RFID tech. In this game, my children had to play  (with support), solve riddles, move throughout the building, interact with items in specific sequences and complete specific adventures with "runes" they aquired through quests.