Digital Badges - Dec 1-15, 2012

TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -
Number of replies: 54

Task 2: The digital badge

3. Identify the digital and internet technologies best suited to create a digital merit badge.
How would you create the digital file (image) of the badge? Is it possible to keep people from copying the badge without having earned the badge?

4. Describe the technologies that could be used to attach (reference or link) the learning to the digital badge.
Is there more than one way of "attaching" learning criteria (or outcomes) to a digital badge? Would this criteria differ from a learners evidence toward earning the badge? Could a badge criteria change through time?

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Stephen Downes -

(Keeping in mind I don't know the details of how Mozilla set up its program - this is only how I would do it, off he top of my head): The badge itself would be a simple PNG image (or even text script; there's no reason why the badge has to have one and only one visual representation). The image of the badge is contained within a div structure indicating that it is a badge. The code is deliberately very simple: For example:

<div class="badge">

<a href="http://badgeissuer.org/badgename/badgewinner">

<img src="http://badgewinner.com/badge.png" />  </a>  </div>

The awarder of the badge (or a third party) keeps a list of the people who received badges. The person is given an image and script referring back to the original list, so when a person clicks on the badge image, they are taken to the awarder or 3rd party certification that the badge is genuine. Here's a sample certificate (could also be in JSON):

<badge resource="http://badgeissuer.org/badgename/">

<badgewinner resource="http://badgewinner.com/" /> </badge>

The certificate, in turn, links to badge criteria, again hosted on the awarder or 3rd party web site. This data, available as structured data (XML or JSON) is standardized: name of badge, issuing organization, criteria, category, etc.

For example:

<badge>

   <name>Man of Letters</badge>

   <issuer resource="http://www.scoutscanada.ca">Scouts Canada</issuer>

   <classification resource="http://schema.org/class/subclass">Class / Subclass</classification>

   <criteria> ...

</badge>

The criteria are created though any number of processes, and would be encoded using a JSON  or XML encoder (the number of badges should be sufficiently low that you don't need an automated way of generating massive numbers of badges).

The badge code (hosted at http://badgeissuer.org/badgename/ ) lists criteria only - the criteria are listed distinct from any evidence of individual achievement. Each criterion has its own URL, eg:

http://badgeissuer.org/badgename#criteria1

or http://badgeissuer.org/badgename/criteria1  (if it's at a separate URL).

Criteria do not change through time; if the criteria change, a new version  of the badge is created, and badges must be referenced through version number. Hence the record for a badge awarded to a person displays only the criteria in use at the time the badge was awarded.

Evidence publicly displayed (unlike, say, this forum) can be listed in the certificate, by URL. For example, at the document hosted at http://badgeissuer.org/badgename/badgewinner, the following code can be used:

<badge resource="http://badgeissuer.org/badgename/">

<badgewinner resource="http://badgewinner.com/" />

<criteria resource="http://badgeissuer.org/badgename/criteria1">

   <evidence ref="http://badgewinner.com/badge/criteria1" /> </criteria>

etc...

</badge>

At least, that's how I'd set it up, first draft...

Do I get a badge now?

In reply to Stephen Downes

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Verena Roberts -

I think you deserve 10 badges for that answer Stephen.

My method of badge creation?

I looked over the Mozilla Badge creation page and P2PU Badge 101 course. It looked too hard and making the badge was the last thing that I had to do before the course started.

SO....

Sent a tweet out to my PLN saying....

Please help me make a badge.

@MrMacnology got back to me - and funny enough @gcouros tweeted me to ask him for help as well. (Getting two responses in twitter is pretty amazing for free help with limited KLOUT)

@MrMacnology created the badge for me as a simple jpg ...I think.

I gave him credit and everyone, and anyone can access this badge.

Although I had to send out instructions on how to copy and paste an image from the wiki page a couple of times.

Here's the "Badge Tracker" page from #Digifoot12

http://digifoot12.wikispaces.com/Badge+Tracker

 For my newest open online course, I tried to make it myself using google.drive, and that was a abd idea because it looks awful.

SO - I sent my description to my design department. Since we hope to create a whole badge system, we are using Mozilla's design of connecting the badge to a link to explain how you can "get a badge", based on some kind of badge platform that has yet to be decided. I have to actually check in with Mozilla and see if I can do this with them...:) Which I haven't done yet....

Now I am in this course explaining my methods of procrastination over badge creation.

Is there a badge for being resourceful?

Verena :)

In reply to Stephen Downes

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Stephen Downes wrote,

"The badge itself would be a simple PNG image (or even text script; there's no reason why the badge has to have one and only one visual representation)."

Peter Rawsthorne replied,

Agreed, there are many ways a badge image could be stored. And I believe badges will have many different visual representations, across all the different awarders of badges. Even within a single badge itself, the visual image could change. A couple of examples of this would be; the pie badge where progress toward a skill is indicated through a pie chart showing progress as a background to the badge. The main image of the badge would be transparently overlayed the pie chart. Another would be a small numeric indicator that shows endorsements or contributions. Stackexchange / codeacademy does this...

I believe the choice of an image file format is important. the png and svg also support the inclusion of meta-data as a part of the actual image file. This data is not displayed, but can be accessed by software. This enables the ability for information about the badge criteria, evidence, issuer, earner, etc. being a part of the image file. Add some encryption to this and the badge image file can become self contained and contain all the information describing the pedagogical and administrative aspects of the badge. More depth on this concept later in the seminar series...

I also like the svg for it is scalable. Allows the image to be resized without losing quality to the image through stretching, etc...

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/imageio/metadata/doc-files/png_metadata.html

http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG/metadata.html

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Julia Hengstler -

I think like most good educational graphic design, the image must be elegant--in that it is simple & clean to display at smaller sizes (e.g. less than 100x100px) but convey the central core of the concept. I believe that significant thought should be invested in the graphic design.

I don't have the technical expertise to design the coding. I would need to go to a 2nd party who have designed the structure where I could upload my image and my criteria & associate myself/institution with the granting of that badge. That 2nd party would also have to help me keep track of those to whom I/my institution have granted the badge.

I'm pondering how much I would like to have some automated credentialing toward the badge in whole or part. Does automated credentialling devalue higher level learning? more complex learning?

In reply to Stephen Downes

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Stephen Downes wrote,

The awarder of the badge (or a third party) keeps a list of the people who received badges.

Peter Rawsthorne replied,

This is the common thread through all approaches to issuers / awarders of badges. A record needs to be kept somewhere, that is online, of who earned a particular badge. This holds true for kahn academy, code academy, four square, travel advisor, mozilla open badges, wikipedia, others... once a badge is released into the wilds of the internet some verifyable record of the badges issue needs to be saved, with the ability for later reference. This is one reason I believe using the meta-data of an image file is the best place long term. Particularly, if upon issue it is verified and encrypted. For the badge can then exist almost without a record back to its issuer / awarder.

This is what I see as a good approach for badges and the storage of their related pedagogical and administrative information. A well though-out meta-data structure that makes reference to a number of the essential data elements. This meta-data structure should become an open internet standard. This structure should be encrypted and baked-in to the image file so it can be harvested out of the badge and used to verify the badge was issued to a particular person against the badges original issuer / awarder. If the issuer / awarder has disappeared (which will happen through time) it can be considered unverifiable... This doesn't mean the badge wasn't valid at one time, just like all the badges I have from 35 years ago. They look official and we could consider them valid... they are just unverifiable.

If we use a standardized meta-data for the badge we could set up a third party that "never" goes away to act as a third party verification source (like internet archive). issuers would have to register themselves and the meta-data would require attributes to facilitate the third-party and timeless verification. It is all possible...

This is close to what the Mozilla Open Badges project is wanting to do...

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by John Dumbrille -

Peter - following up from your "that is what the Mozilla Open Badges project is wanting to do."... Do you mean the MOB project is trying to establish a standard code for badge meta data, or is trying to establish itself as a central registry, or both? 

In the absence of a common standard, and a common registry, what do you suggest badge users use for the time being?

John

In reply to John Dumbrille

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

John,

The way I see it, and how I understand it to be; Mozilla's end point would be a fully realized open standard digital badges meta-data specification. This would mean every digital badge being issued could be displayed, stored and managed how the earner would like. Right now you earn badges and they are stuck in the system that issued the badge. In the end i would like to bring all my badges (khan academy, foursquare, code academy, mozilla, wikipedia, etc...) into one place for display and organization how I see best describes and gives credentials toward my learning.

Right now Mozilla is building a bunch of open source software to support thier open badges effort. Once they get to a place where their is an open meta-data specification and a few instances of the federated backpack I would think they would start backing away from the source code and continue supporting the specification.

I do not think Mozilla wants to host any server or become a central registry. This is why they have floated the idea of the federated backpack. And from an software architecture perspective, I agree.

For an explanation of the federated backpack please visit my blog post on the subject; http://criticaltechnology.blogspot.ca/2012/10/federated-backpack-demystified.html

In reply to Stephen Downes

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Stephen Downes wrote,

Do I get a badge now?

Peter Rawsthorne replied,

Not yet Stephen. Yes, I know I said all you had to do is introduce yourself and contribute to two discussion threads to earn the learner badge. But, I consider you one of the global thought leaders in online education, pedagogy, connected learning, etc... and i expect more from you. I know its not fair, but this is my online forum and i am the moderator. You need to prove to me that you have learned something new before I am willing to issue you the learner badge. <big huge smile>

If you asked again or if you complained to BCCampus administration I would issue the badge... I just want to challenge you a little more, because I think the teacher still has a place in online education. And I think we need to adjust our expectations up for some students (learning still needs to be personalized), and i think that is ok. Both online and face-to-face...

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Wayne Mackintosh -

I don't have any issues if the image associated with a badge is copied - -in fact I hope that badge issuers would reuse openly licensed images for reuse and adaptation.

There are a variety of technologies which could be used.

I think its more important to consider the components that would contribute to the token value and trust of a digital badges. I think the token value of a badge could, for example, be measured by the extent that the economy, society etc would be prepared to act on a the digital badge credential of a recipient, for instance, a job offer, or entrust a badge recipient with some postition associated with a system of meritocracy within an open community .

The components which would contribute to the levels of trust of a badging system might include:

  • Clear and open / transparent identification of the individual / organisation that exercised the value judgement associated with the badge (for example a peer-learner(s), the self-assessor, reacher / mentor, institution etc) - That is, someone must take responsibility and be accountable for the value judgement.
  • Transparent or open identification of the criteria applied for awarding the badge.
  • Transparent access to the evidence on which the badge was awarded.  

   

 

In reply to Wayne Mackintosh

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by B Ferrell -

Peter

I have not used digital badges, but I think they would be beneficial if they were authenticated from the provider.

Here is how a January 2012 Mooc is doing theirs:

 

https://sites.google.com/a/olds.ac.uk/oldsmooc/development-blog/olds-moocbadgingstrategy

https://sites.google.com/a/olds.ac.uk/oldsmooc/development-blog/moocbadgingandthelearningarc

 

Any open source graphics program could be used to generate a badge, but linking it to "earned authentication" so that someone cannot just copy and use the badge without having earned it would be an essential if it is to be a valued item.

Bev Ferrell

In reply to B Ferrell

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

B Ferrell wrote,

but linking it to "earned authentication" so that someone cannot just copy and use the badge without having earned it would be an essential if it is to be a valued item.

Peter Rawsthorne replied,

Totally agree! Digital badges need to be authenticated with a learner to a badge [criteria, institution (CoP), evaluator, etc]. This is where the issuer / awarder will require either;

  1. a list of earners (probably at some URL) that a particular badge can be authenticated / verified against.
  2. or an assertion "token" that a particular earned badge can be authenticated / verified against. This is where an archive of issued badges may come in... I want to verify this particular earned badge 35 years from now...
In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by David Porter -

Kinda like an exam, credential, transcript and an articulation and transfer guide - but digital, automated, verifiable and portable? ;-}

Looking for differentiators to convention.

 

In reply to David Porter

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

So am I, David; so am I.

I sometimes struggle with why we would consider using badges within the traditional learning experience... the journey toward accreditation is well known, proven and culturally entrenched. Why introduce a new model?

often I really think digital badges should be targeting the population who doesn't engage in HE / tertiary education. It makes up a much larger % of the global population (70% with 2007 stats)... and this would then be a differentiator to convention. But this really kicks off a whole other conversation, kinda outside this seminar series... good point though...

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by David Porter -

Thanks Peter.

Didn't intend to derail conversation on the central theme.  That's why I kept it short.

Your point re. the 70% is the biggie.

d.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Gina Bennett -

hi Peter, you said:

>>why we would consider using badges within the traditional learning experience... the journey toward accreditation is well known, proven and culturally entrenched. Why introduce a new model?

And yes, I understand that this forum is about 'digital badges' & not supposed to be targetted towards uses in higher/tertiary education. But I would like to pick just a bit at your comment about accreditation being well known, proven, & culturally entrenced. Yes, you are right: the current HE system of accreditation *is* well known & god knows it's culturally entrenced. But is it the best way; should it be the only way of credentialling the learning that happens in HE?

The culturally entrenced way of credentialling HE learning is not necessarily fair nor representative of what people actually learn. It is not all that granular, for one thing, & it's often not very authentic. I think there's lots of room for a parallel system that takes the assessment of learning out of the extreme monopoly of the current system.

And yeah, I don't doubt that a far greater percentage of humanity takes part in informal or nonformal education. I'm guessing that in at least some cases, they do it this way because they are not looking for any tangible recognition (not even badges) beyond the satisfaction in learning something new.  

I would love to see something like a digital badge system that recognized the achievement of learning outcomes regardless of where they were learned, something that might gradually achieve some legitimacy & currency within the huge higher ed machinery & perhaps make the promise of 'recognition for prior learning' a little less hollow.

But probably this is a discussion for a later SCoPE!

Gina

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Jeffrey Keefer -

Hmm, so badges as a way to "certify" formal learning outside of higher education . . .

In reply to Wayne Mackintosh

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Wayne,

You make many good points here.

I often use images from the noun project all CC0 - http://thenounproject.com/

your thoughts on transparency are also strong.

totally agree with the verify-ability, accountability, responsibility, etc... of the badge. This is why I like the idea of these attributes baked into the badge, so it can be dusted off 30 years later and opened with some software to varify the badge against some timeless archive. Or some other method... I like to refer back to the physical world where my bachelor degree was awarded by the Open Learning Agency (OLA) in British Columbia. OLA no longer exists, but I can still go to BCIT and TRU to verify my coursework and awarding of the degree. I think we will need to have something similar for digital badges...

In reply to Wayne Mackintosh

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Julia Hengstler -

I think the transparency of who granted the badge for what tasks/skills demonstrated is critical--like a registry. Others could then accept badges as credentials based on who's issuing and what criteria. I think that others accepting badges would want some type of sampling of how the criteria are applied....hmm.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Iain Robertson -

3. Identify the digital and internet technologies best suited to create a digital merit badge.
 This is where I am interested in people's thoughts and experiences. I don't have a lot of expereince in this area but wanted to create a badge for the interprofessional conflict resolution competency. To achieve the badge a persone would have to demonstrate the competency in a reliable way. To create the badge I went to www.onlinelogomaker.com . I am sure there are ways to stop people from copying the badge.

4. Describe the technologies that could be used to attach (reference or link) the learning to the digital badge.
I would hope that there is more than one way to attach learning outcomes to the badge and I think that one of the strengths of a badge system is the potential flexibility. For example, I see the conflict resolution badge being awarded after a series of learning events ranging from exposure to the competency (a short interactive workshop with a reflection for example) to an enhanced experience where the competency would be front and centre (e.g. an interprofessional team working with a specific condition/pathology where conflict may arise or can be introduced for facilitation purposes).

Iain

 

 

In reply to Iain Robertson

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Julia Hengstler -

What a great badge design for conflict resolution! It think the human figures in different colours who appear to be holding hands around a table is highly emblematic! I think that scalability gets effected when text is incorporated into the badge. For example, I think the graphic can be reduced quite a bit and still hold its message--but the text doesn't.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Ken Udas -

Hello

3) I am not sure that I have much to offer here.  A nice tool allowing the creator to upload images would be dandy.

4) I am guessing that some sort of descriptive schema as Stephen suggests makes sense. There ought to be a way to content the badge representation, with the description of the learning outcomes, perhaps with the artifacts describing assessment and the artifacts that were assessed (if appropriate and accessible).

Is there a role for RDF?

- Cheers

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Sylvia Riessner -

Stephen's description of creation, posting and linking of a png image seems logical to me. What it links back to could be modified depending on the extent to which you need to be able to discern what the badge award means in terms of learning outcomes, accomplishments, skill levels, whatever.

I think Wayne's comment about the necessity of having someone (or some institution?) willing to take responsibility for what the badge stands for and whether the person actually earned it or demonstrated the learning is crucial or else we're all going to have pretty pictures without much substance (think Canadian Tire money)

I can't contribute much beyond that; it will be interesting to follow how some of the badge projects mentioned by others in this forum deal with the technical issues and what the pros and cons are.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Paddy Fahrni -

3. Identify the digital and internet technologies best suited to create a digital merit badge.

Will have to learn from others here. Something open . . .

4. Describe the technologies that could be used to attach (reference or link) the learning to the digital badge.

A little swamped here - need to learn more about the Mozilla project. Full of questions. How does the badge live on if the badged learning is a long-past event, if the badge granting person/body is long gone? 

I'm interested in badges as motivators that represent aspects of learning valuable to the learner. Looked at a few badge sites - and recalled that years ago my son and friends would huddle for hours examining these small, illustrated POG disk things that they got by either buying or wily trading.

At the time, getting the POG things had value for the little boyos - they created interaction, provided paths for categorizing and organizing, for trading and persuading.  I saw the long forsaken POG things again last week while sorting through old stuff. The value was ephemeral. The things themselves sit unused.

Do badges need to live on?

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by John Dumbrille -

3. I guess Peter's answer is best, but I'm curious about svg format, as I dont know if my free editor supports it.

4. As for preferred "attaching" techologies for badges: I can only speak conceptually here, and defer to technical knoweldge shared here. I see some type of encryption or link to a hosted list needed verifiying that the badge wasnt cut and pasted ( and illigitmately shown by me). If encryption is fakable, a list, though chunky, is probably needed. I also like the ikea of various meta data attached (type of badge; about the issuer) and a possible link to the issuer (possibly including their "list" of official badge holders) 

In reply to John Dumbrille

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Wayne Mackintosh -

John,

There is a free software editor called Inkscape which supports the svg format. Download and install and discover the amazing world of scalable vector graphics :-)

In reply to Wayne Mackintosh

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Richard Jones -
Inkscape is great, very easy to use. Very easy to make simple badges with simple shapes, text and gradient fills even if you are not a graphic designer.
In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by bronwyn hegarty -
this is a fascinating discussion. I still need convincing that digital badges are going to deliver the wow factor - if I am not a magpie - a collector of bright and shiny things - why would I want one really? Imagine an employer making the effort to decipher what each one means. Perhaps this will work while they are a novelty, but at the moment the system is feeling like the one cowboys used to use in the wild west when collecting notches on their belts. Do we know if the learners actually care if they get one or not? That is more important to me than who keeps what where and how they are credentialed. Straight talking cowgirl from the deep south. :)
In reply to bronwyn hegarty

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Barbie Bruce -

I agree Bronwyn, I need convincing. Is this a novel useful idea or another PR ploy and way for organizations to promote their brand?

"Do we know if the learners actually care if they get one or not?"

Some probably do care, but what is the effort are they willing to put in to get one.  I am sure for others, and I fall into that camp, the badge does not matter, it is the learning that is important.

In reply to Barbie Bruce

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Barbie, Bronwyn and others...

I agree, there is a fair bit of scepticism around badges... but digital badges have gone way beyond PR...

I wish i could provide a mind dump of all I have seen over the last couple years while researching and engaging with digital badges. There are a lot of badge systems that are having a lot of success. And some of them are specifically focused on skills and knowledge development.

One discussion that stands out includes and inner-city teacher describing the swagger a student got from receiving a badge, the child had never shown such enthusiasm over learning...

Jump into the Mozilla Open Badges Google group and start following some of the discussion threads about some of the K12 and HE successes. There are many, also some of the self-directed projects that professors have awarded badges and given credit is also amazing...

One organization in particular HASTAC ( http://hastac.org/ ) has thier Digital Media and Learning Competition which has recently focused on implementations of Open Badges... thay are also getting funding for a fair number of research projects to provide some rigor to seeking evidence around the use of badges in learning... all good.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by bronwyn hegarty -

Peter

Now I'm getting interested... evidence to show that digital badges motivate learners to get down and get with it. In some ways I agree with Barbie - surely the joy of learning is enough? But we all know that it is often the end goal that is perceived as more important. I look forward to exploring some of the success stories. Bron

In reply to bronwyn hegarty

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Joyce McKnight -

I am getting motivated too...in fact, I am finding this

addictive.  :-) I like to learn "for the sake of learning"

but am often motivated by guilt or a sense of

accountability...with badges I can show others that I have not

just been "wasting my time."  I suppose I am pulled by

intrinsic motivation but pushed by extrinsic.

In reply to bronwyn hegarty

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Carlos Ortiz -

Hi everyone!

For years now I’ve been lurking Scope forums, and I can assure there’s lots of things I’ve learned, because a lot of its participants are the most relevant people in the world of technologies, learning communities, practice communities and contemporary education. However,  despite being a high level community, people write things that are understandable and they are really nice to others, answer their posts, and discussions and even controversy happens in such a friendly  way that makes me feel brave enough to take part in the discussion.

I agree with Stephen, Sylvia, Bronwin.  I’m from Colombia, and let me tell you here in Latin America, besides the pride it means to be awarded with a badge, it would also be very important and practical that the badge was backed by some institute, as it would be more meaningful, useful and could even be used in resumes when finding a new job.

For the moment, as I said, this forum atmosphere makes me feel at ease and self confident to break up my lurker position and jump into the discussion. Thank you all! My hat for this community and its participants!

About  internet technology to send the badges I think you could use Word’s mail combination option linked to an excel file with the names and IDs. of participants. This way, everyone would get his/her badge and it would be very easy for the sender too.

Creating badges, is no problem  if you use the option mentioned before, you could take any free format from Internet or just draw one using paint.

Thank you all

Carlos Ortiz

In reply to Carlos Ortiz

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Hola Carlos,

Thanks for contributing... I am always grateful for perspectives from other parts of the world.

I am curious is their any kind of maker movement or self directed groups of hobbiests / inventors in Columbia? Where do the self-directed learners go? Or does the idea of taking learning into your own "hands" and finding a different path not occur so frequently?

Be Well...

Peter

In reply to bronwyn hegarty

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Julia Hengstler -

I think that badge collection speaks to the gamification of education that is emerging. We have so many kids in a generation immersed in electronic play--leveling up, gaining digital badges of cyber materials to leverage for higher play.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by bronwyn hegarty -
from my perspective, if the evidence to demonstrate that a badge is earned is to be deemed solid then the criteria need to align. my only hope is that the learners have been involved in setting their learning outcomes and get the chance to reflect on whether they do in fact meet the criteria - which they should ideally be involved in developing. Self-assessment as well as peer assessment would be key to the success of the worthiness of digital badges, and I dont think facilitators should have anything to do with their distribution, otherwise they are just another teacher-directed achievement-driven reward system with no street (community) credibility...that colleagues is the key to their success I believe...community cred. Bron
In reply to bronwyn hegarty

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Bronwyn,

Deep down I believe the whole digital badge discussion should be elsewhere. And that elsewhere is with the self-directed learners, Communities of Practice, peer-based activities, and all those that fall outside the traditional... I think these would be the places where badges could be better applied. And unfortunately, digital badges have caught the attention of the academics and educators and it is getting pulled into traditional education and academia. instead of working with people and focusing on those in the lower right of this graph they should only focus on those in the center or upper left of this graph. Really I don't even think the researchers should come from the lower right, they bring a bias... and most of them hold their degrees in high regard. Just ask a PhD if they think they could replace their PhD with a large collection of badges. Now that's an interesting conversation! oh no, my outlier just fully emerged!

More people are without tertiary education, this should be the focus of badges...

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by bronwyn hegarty -
could each learner create the digital badge as a photographic image representing what the experience means to him or her. could an image sharing site such as Flickr or picassa be used to store the badge collection with each image accompanied by a description of what was learned to earn the badge and what it means plus a list of comments (from peers) the evidence that they were worth something- or is this just too simplistic?
In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Christine Horgan -

Ah, Peter:

 I feel that I am about to fail this second part of badge earning -- unless there are marks for effort. (I hear shades of "Could try harder" that was often attached to my elementary school report cards :( )

3. Digital and internet technologies: Not a clue. As a mostly non-technie person, I haven't a clue how/where/in what badges should be created. I do know, however, that whatever the how/where/in what is, it absolutely has to be idiot-proof for the user and idiot-proof for whoever needs to check out the badge.

4. Technologies used to attach a badge: how about something that I "own" and control --similar concept to my Linked In page or an e-portfolio--where I can house all my badges regardless of where they were earned.

As for revoking badges, good grief, does that mean my hard-earned M.Ed. could be revoked when I retire? A badge earned is a badge earned regardless of time.

Cheers, Chris

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Mary Pringle -

I don't get the badge for this one. I have no opinion about the best technologies--that's something I'm hoping to learn from my colleagues--so far, so good.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by David Porter -

3. Identify the digital and internet technologies best suited to create a digital merit badge.

Minimally an open and portable file format to display the badge at various scales. I wonder if a specific file format may need to be created to suit.

4. Describe the technologies that could be used to attach (reference or link) the learning to the digital badge.

Ugly metadata ahead, unless a simple form-based system could be put together for badge generation and management. I'm guessing this is what the Mozilla project is doing and we'll learn more during this seminar.  Bet there are other developers on a parallel track.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Leah Marie -

I think that the first part of this question could be handled by a third-party. I think that, ideally, the badge issuer shouldn't have to be overly concerned with the technical creation and nitty-gritty coding side of this badge-ing system. Because I, personally, really don't know what tech would be best!

And I don't know if it answers the question, but I was thinking about issuing a badge after the completion of a specific challenge or at the completion of a certain goal. For example: issuing a badge for the completion of our online tutorial. That also gives badge reviewers a way to go back and see, exactly, what the badge holder did to receive the badge. I've been looking to games a lot for this, and that idea of a specific action leading to a specific achievement makes sense to me.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Patric Lougheed -

3. Identify the digital and internet technologies best suited to create a digital merit badge.

This is a chance for me test one of my favorite online diagramming software and let everyone edit/create their own badge. If you follow this link you can collaborate on badges using a very powerful set tools. I based mine on the scope logo...

https://cacoo.com/diagrams/rCuNtnmUcfK6nhqo

I have opened this diagram space so anyone can edit and feel free to play!!! Add your own and have fun.

4. Describe the technologies that could be used to attach (reference or link) the learning to the digital badge.

Hard to follow Mr. Downes but I imagine a system much like the oauth api where I as issuer could provide badge meta-data and graphical data (could even be HTML5 Canvas/CSS3) upon request from any recognized social profile that has been linked to the recipients profile. I am one of those people who requires scope and context, I think such a system would need a mechnanism for catagorization or a basic taxonomy like tags. This way I could tell Linkedin to only show badges that I as an instructional technologist would want to have appear by using keywords like Moodle or edtech.

In reply to Patric Lougheed

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Peter Rawsthorne -

Patric,

I just love how these badges you created are community based. I so appretiate the effort you have made!

So working left to right, these would be the learner badge, the participant badge, and the contributor badge?

Nice!

Peter

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Patric Lougheed -

Thanks Peter,

I actually had no set purpose for the designs... kind of hoping this community would find consensus and maybe a few others could share their creations. 

I am open to being open!

In reply to Patric Lougheed

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by bronwyn hegarty -

that was fun. Thx Patric it is very easy to use. Bron

In reply to Patric Lougheed

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Julia Hengstler -

Patric, I think visually you bring up a good question. Like with good branding, if a set of badges build collectively to a specific credential, should they have similar visual elements? Should a component of the badge reflect the issuer? Eg. like the Purdue Passport?

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Joyce McKnight -

3. Identify the digital and internet technologies best suited to create a digital merit badge.
How would you create the digital file (image) of the badge? Is it possible to keep people from copying the badge without having earned the badge?

I'm afraid I am not web savvy enough to know how

to do the first task.  I would imagine that people

awarding badges would have access rules that

prevent stealing.  I don't know the technology

well but I think badges might actually be harder

to claim or post falsely than CEU (continuing

education units or even college transcripts

because they could be directly tied to the issuing

organization. 

I have attached the 4th question because of

continuing problems with centering.

 

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Scott Perian -

Before picking a specific file format, it seems like there are at least some properties of whatever format chosen that should apply:

  • It should be portable, able to be extracted from system of issuer and used as the owner sees fit.
  • It should be an open/freely licensed format, (avoid any proprietary formats where licensing issues could get in the way of generation, such as the problems that have long plagued the gif format)
  • It should be self contained, ideally in one file, so bits and pieces of it dont get lost along the way.
  • It should be possible to embed in a web page via a portable snippet of html.
  • It should not solely exist in the context of a web page, also should be usable within mobile apps or other things that may want to consume it.
  • It should be easy to consume/parse by external tools who may want to do more than just display an image, may also want to pull out the embedded metadata for use.

I'm torn between the mindset that the badge is an image + some metadata, and what Stephen suggested initially that the badge might just be a snippet of xml or json.  As a programmer i'd much prefer to be parsing json or even xml then trying to extract metadata from an image.  As someone designing a badge spec, choosing  a format that can be easily integrated into  more webapplications seems key, and i'm not really sure on the availability of png (or svg) metadata parsing libraries in most of the programming languages used today.  Also I'm not sure that we want to be wedded to one specific visualization of the badge. Perhaps i want some minimal descriptive text displayed along with it (name of badge, when it was issued) either in the page or as alt text for accessiblity, not sure how the notion of badge as metadata completely embeded into an image would play into that.

In terms of what data goes into the badge, it seems like we're really talking about two separate types of data/metadata here as well, there is 1. data about the definition of the badge (what the graphic looks like, what requirments of badge are, info about the issuer, etc) and 2. data about actual issuing of the badge, (i.e. what badge - essentially a reference to definition of the badge, who received it, and when, evidence, signature/authenticity statement, etc)
And with this we have two approaches, A.) keep the data clean and the issued badge (whatever format) just contains a reference to badge definition and all the data about actual issuing of the badge, or B.) copy all the information about the badge  definition into each issued badge.  
I believe putting all the metadata into a image essentially falls into the second category while Stephen's xml (or json) approach is in the first.

And lastly, more as a lark, how much do we really want to be wedded to images.  Why not embed metadata in mp3 and then your audio badge could be a recording of someone actualy awarding you the badge that you could embed on a website or carry around and listen to on your ipod.

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Margot Croft -

First off, Patric--thank you for the way cool link!  That was fun and easy to use. 

Wow--best suited to create....  The one that the creator of the badge enjoys using the most/can apply most easily I reckon.  Am new to the world of badges, but there seems to be a whole lot 'out there' to play with.

As for references or links--I'm working on understanding that.  Can appreciate that peer review could add weight to the badge, though a starting point (baseline) is good.  Once the badge is attained, maybe peer review could up it to a bronze, silver or gold.  All this is dependent on how the badge is being used, though.  And could a badge criteria change over time?  Well yes, but it probably shouldn't.  If I get a badge now, then revisit it in 5 years, I want to be reminded of what I did then to achieve the merit, not what's currently applicable.   

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Judy Southwell -

Hi Peter,

3. I would like to see the image of the badge created so that people who might not have access to newer technologies and high-speed connectivity can easily use it. It should be widely usable in various technologies, e.g. via Internet web pages, signature blocks, mobile phones--not just Smart phones, etc.  I don't know enough about designing badges to say whether it is possible to prevent them from being copied by another.  However, I do think it important that there are effective means for determing whether the meta-data is valid and belongs to whomever has legitimately been awarded the badge.

4. I don't know enough about technologies to attach learning to the badge, but I do think it should be sufficiently easy for the average individual to use.  Privacy issues might need to be explored, e.g. location of storage of data.  Allowing for some flexibility in changing a badge's criteria over time might be useful, too.  Perhaps there could be some mechanism such as a time-stamp to point to the criteria the badge represents.

In reply to Judy Southwell

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Julia Hengstler -

Hey, Stranger.

Your email still showing as VIU--is that correct? Where are you & how are you these days?

Julia

In reply to Peter Rawsthorne

Re: TASK 2 (Dec 2nd): The digital badge

by Julia Hengstler -

I'm wondering if there should be some taxonomy for badges like:

  • self-declared, industry-defined, academia-defined, organization-defined?
  • automatically generated? peer reviewed? mentor reviewed?
  • others?