Blogging in Professional Networks: Nov 8-26, 2010

What is your experience with blogging?

What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -
Number of replies: 34

I would like to invite you to describe your experiences with reading and writing blogs and micro-blogs. You can post your responses in your own blogs, and tag it as SCoPE-edublogging. Then post a short link to your blog within the forum.

For those entirely new to blogs, what are your impressions and perceptions about the usefulness of blogs? Post your response in the forum.

If you are new to blogging, but who do follow blogs, respond

  1. How do you think blogs work as a networking tool?
  2. What features do you think are important?

For those who have had experience as a blogger, here are some guiding questions:

  1. What are a couple main reasons for why you blog?
  2. What roles does the blog play?
  3. What other bloggers do you follow? Why?
  4. What is your preferred style of writing?
  5. How frequently do you post?
  6. Has your blogging changed over time?

In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Dilip Barad -
Dear Glenn Groulx,
Thanks for initiating a very useful discussion on blogs. Here are my responses: (For those who have had experience as a blogger, here are my responses):

What are a couple main reasons for why you blog?
Dilip: To share, to network, to teach. Well, I am able to share and network successfully but still 'teaching' is on experiment base with little outcome.
What roles does the blog play?
Dilip: Blogs play very important role in self expression. It helps a lot in self-learning. Blogs in teaching are very useful in tasks like assignment submission, commenting on peer-blogs, teacher-comment etc.
What other bloggers do you follow? Why?
Dilip: I follow blogs of my students so tby hat I get updates regarding their submission of assignments and comments by other classmates. I follow blogs of educationist - to learn innovative ways of teaching methodologies shared by them on thier blog.
What is your preferred style of writing?
Dilip: I dont understand this question. Yet let me try from what I understood. I prefer to blog in blended way - i.e. text and image posted together. At times, I also publish PPT presentations... at times, links are shared.
How frequently do you post?
Dilip: For self-expression: Once in a month. For teaching and learning - almost daily some activities are done on blog.
Has your blogging changed over time?
Dilip: Yes... initially, it was just time pass and to try out something new. Now, it has become more serious and meaningful.
In reply to Dilip Barad

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Thank you Dilip for your post. I find that the use of blogs sometimes requires a choice to spend less time on something else - do you think students feel they are "wasting" their time on blogging? From your experience, do you think most students are unclear of the reasons for why they will benefit, and should persist?

In terms of style, I was referring to whether the writing you do is more intended for students (formal), colleagues (very formal) or for oneself (less formal, almost casual).

Looking forward to discussing ideas with you.

Glenn

In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Dilip Barad -
Well, yes, blogging is time consuming. We have to manage time and set our priority for blogging and I have felt that as the initial enthusiasm subsides, the blogging is pushed back in the priority list.
So far as students are concerned, I still have to take their feedback. I have made it mandatory to publish 'assignments' on blog. So the students have done it. In next sem, i will take their feedback from students and I will surely ask the question you raised. I think there is some grains of truth in it.

I prefer to have informal tone when blog is for self expression and am formal when its for teaching-learning purpose.
Dr. Dilip Barad
Bhavnagar uni
Gujarat - India
In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Emma Duke-Williams -
Hi everyone,
I've had a blog since August 2004; though my use has been patchy!
What are a couple main reasons for why you blog?
Initially, I started using it as we were going to have a group of students using them, so I thought I ought to get going before I got them to do it. Seemed unfair to get them do something I wasn't familiar with!
What roles does the blog play?
Primarily for me to organise ideas - if students read it & learn, so much the better, if others read & comment, even better, though gathering more readers isn't a particular concern of mine.
What other bloggers do you follow? Why?
When I started, it was a range of other educational technologists (e.g. Steven Downes, Josie Fraser, James Clay etc., etc, etc). Now I tend to use twitter & see what people who I follow by tweet are reading & recommending - so a range of others.
What is your preferred style of writing?
I guess 'informalish' (I did one of those things that are meant to identify your gender from your writing style. It said I was female. I am. Not sure what that actually indicates!)
How frequently do you post?
Very infrequently at the moment - I cite lack of time (it's my heavy teaching semester), but also too much tweeting (and, no, I don't want to set up twitter to feed into my blog; I think I use them in different ways.
I also have a private, research based blog, which i do use more than the public one at present. I really ought to look at publicising some of the posts.
Has your blogging changed over time?
See previous! I've got far more into tweeting in the past year or so. But keep intending to get back into blogging. Perhaps this will help. (Or perhaps it will help that I now have a decent laptop at home, so can blog from the sofa)
In reply to Emma Duke-Williams

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Thank you for your post, Emma, it gives me a snapshot of your blogging activities. One of the things we will be covering next week is the use of Twitter as a micro-blogging tool, and providing options for integrating the micro-blogging tools into "regular" blogging.

You also mentioned you have several blogs, including a professional blog - is that edublog more formal than the teaching sandbox blog?

Do you enable commenting on all your blogs? D'Arcy Norman has disabled commenting from his own edublog, for example.

Looking forward to our discussion.

Glenn

In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Michael Griffith -

Hi all, just catching the tail end of this conversation (or is it the beginning). I facilitated a discussion on Scope a year or so ago on Blogging and am still now using it actively in my university teaching; in fact I have just finished a short research project in which I have tried to identify student perceptions of the value of blogging as part of their study of literature. I am interested in the extent to which it assists their engagement with texts and with each other. Typically I mandate that students do a weekly blog on their literature reading (which can also include more personal reflections); they must also make a weekly comment on each other's work. I give them feedback on their grammar and writing skills and insist that these are A1. At the end of the semester they have a major project in which they utilize their semester worth of blogging and transform their work (critical, creative and reflective) into an ePortfolio. Currently I am using WordPress for their blogging and this turns nicely into a platform for their ePortfolio where they simply post "Pages" instead of "Posts".  While my work with on-campus students is behind a university Fire-wall I consistently copy my behind fire-wall blog onto a public blogging space. You can find these at either of the following two addresses:

http://michaelgriffith1.wordpress.com

http://michaelgriffith.livejournal.com

There is a little bit of local history involved with my switch from LiveJournal (which I still love) to WordPress. Our university mandated that for the purposes of student security they be put behind a fire-wall (not all were happy with this). So I was moved from LiveJournal to WordPress.org.

I have also published on my work. You can find a chapter in the book

Empowering Adult Learners through Blog: An Australian Case Study, (with Loong Wong), Chapter 2 of Adult Learning in the Digital Age.  Terry T. Kidd (Ed.). Igi Global: 2010. There is a link to this book at: http://www.igi-global.com/bookstore/Chapter.aspx?TitleId=36854

Look forward to hearing some responses

Best wishes

Michael (Australian Catholic University- Sydney Campus)

In reply to Michael Griffith

Blogging to Enhance Learning seminar

by Sylvia Currie -
Michael, what a coincidence! I was just looking back at the Blogging to Enhance Learning seminar you facilitated and came back here to post a link to it. Then look! You're right here in the forum. We actually hosted that seminar in February, 2007. Can you believe it was that long ago?

So glad to see you, and yes, it's just the beginning of the conversation. :-)
In reply to Sylvia Currie

Re: Blogging to Enhance Learning seminar

by Michael Griffith -
Good to hear from you Sylvia... while I am deep into end of year marking I will look up occasionally and see what I can learn from (and add to) that conversation... Yes amazing.... where did that 3 years go!
Cheers
Michael
In reply to Michael Griffith

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Hi Michael,

Welcome to the seminar!

You mention that your students are encouraged to post in the open from behind the institutional firewall. How many of them do so? Have you noticed that at the beginning of the course, there is a warming up period, a period of reluctance to blog, a reticence, and you need to engage them in a dialogue to persuade them to contribute? 

I remember when I reached a critical transition as a graduate student at Athabasca University while I was engaged in independent study, and my professor wanted me to start publishing in the open to a more public audience. I was nervous, and it was a big decision to be more open when up till that time I had been blogging within a secure learning space.

Glenn

In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Michael Griffith -
Hi Glenn... there have been mixed responses. The first cohort that I had (back in 2005) were thrown into the deep end and all used LiveJournal in an open environment. We were all new to this at that time. Some students were nervous, but most seemed to love the opportunity, not only to share with each other, but also with family, friends and students from other institutions. Several students boasted about how they had received commendations from overseas- and in one case a professor at BC asked one of my students whether he would be happy to have is poem published.

This group of students were upset when they were told they had to go behind a firewall... and they were also responding to my unhappiness at seeing a good thing being forced underground.(with no good reason- might I add: while the legal eagles were nervous about possible student harassment and/ or litigation, no single event had come to anyone's notice about the work that was happening in our LiveJournal Blog.....

Be that as it may, the recent co- hort of students who began behind the firewall with WordPress are now nervous about the possibility of going "outside".... I suggest to them, that if they want to be seen by the big wide world, then exporting from WordPress.org to Wordpress.com is a no-brainer.... but I would say there are only around 5% who take up this suggestion.... Hope that seeds the discussion.
Cheers
Michael
In reply to Michael Griffith

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Hi Michael,

I have been blogging both as a students and then as an alumnus within an ELGG platform at Athabasca University, and having the option to set the privacy settings to limit who can view the posts played an important role for me with becoming more aware of the implications for both blogging within a cohort (peers only) and then blogging in the open for a larger audience.

I wonder if the current cohort of students are more wary of blogging "in the open" partly because of a heightened awareness of their privacy (perhaps now more aware of the potential dangers after being sensitized by media reports?). Perhaps also because there is a more distinct separation now for many users between school-related activities and social-family activities.

Glenn

In reply to Michael Griffith

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Dilip Barad -
Dear Michael Griffith,
Thanks for sharing your educational blogs. They are inspiring. I also use blog (www.blogger.com) for teaching literature. Some of your ideas will help me.
regards,
Dilip Barad
Bhavnagar Uni
Gujarat - India
In reply to Dilip Barad

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Michael Griffith -
Great to hear that others are using Blogging for teaching literature. How do you use it Dilip? Do you have a regular fixed, assessable requirement? How do you encourage your students to engage?
Cheers
Michael
In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Emma Duke-Williams -
Hi Glenn,
Sorry, took some time to get back to you!
You also mentioned you have several blogs, including a professional blog - is that edublog more formal than the teaching sandbox blog?

No, I don't think so, my research one (rather than 'professional') is more for thoughts in progress.

Do you enable commenting on all your blogs?
Yes, can't see the point in not, unless I'd got it set to be entirely private / was running it from a memory stick. That said, the research blog does have posts that are private / limited audience.
My comments on commenting referred more to the point that I don't blog for comments, so if there aren't any, I'm not worried. I know that others do find that worrying.

In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Leva Lee -
Hi Glenn and everybody,

I'm a colleague of Sylvia's at BCcampus and I'm new to this...I've dipped my toe in the blog waters with a few posts on the ETUG "What's New?" blog and am experimenting with e-Blogger and dabbled with microblogging.

I see the value of blogging to connect us with others with similar interests and ideas, and their process of making sense of things...It really is "learning out in the open" which can be a bit uncomfortable at first. I like that it does commit us to take the time for reflection which is when we often get our "aha moments". I do follow a few bloggers and enjoy reading about what they are working on or working out (in a thinking aloud kind of way).

Hearing about your work Glenn has inspired me to take the plunge and give it a try.


In reply to Leva Lee

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Lystra Sampson-Ovid -
Hi Everyone,
I have been following the discussion but feel inspired by Leva's contribution. Like quite a few persons I follow blogs on education...especially open and distance learning , open education resources, ICT integration; started a few blogs myself..but have not had the discipline to maintain any. I am interested in this session since it promises to provide tips for maintaining educational blogs. I have been inspired by persons who use blogging in their teaching...but for those of us outside the classroom....I see blogging as chronicling research and ideas, organising thoughts and stimulating intelectual discourse. I need to get started again.
Lystra
In reply to Lystra Sampson-Ovid

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Hello Lystra,

Welcome to the blogging seminar!

I think that using blogs for chronicling is an important aspect of formal academic blogging. For me, this process of reporting and commenting on conferences and seminars involves jotting down notes, collecting short voice narrations, preparing and conducting short impromptu interviews with participants and presenters during coffee breaks and lunchtime, collecting and reflecting on backchannel Twitter commentary during presentations, and doing a post-conference blog post reviewing the archived presentations.

This reporting process takes several weeks, and lead to numerous posts, podcasts and uploaded files. I upload the raw notes, oultines, scanned images of conference notes, and voice notes to a sandbox part of my edublog, a more private "holding space".  I tag these these for my private use, categorizing them as separate artefacts that i might re-visit and re-use at some later time. I add meta-narrative, add context cues, so I can remember the context of the isolated tidbits and info-scraps.

I then begin weaving the content together as a narrative, linking and embedding the pieces into a series of posts. I am always looking for ways to tag and categorize these posts, and often check out the Tag Clouds of other edubloggers, to compare my tagging strategies with theirs. How did they do their tagging? What are they posting about? What data streams and info-scraps are they weaving into their narrative? What sources are they quoting, citing, or drawing from?

The chronicling process involves a cycle of reading others' blogs, filtering, synthesizing and sense-making. It is an example of how one can comfortably blog in the open by sharing one's thoughts and ideas and processes of idea capture.

reposted to my edublog here

Glenn

In reply to Lystra Sampson-Ovid

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Leva Lee -
Hi Lystra, We've met before. Great to meet you here in this seminar. Cheers,
Leva
In reply to Leva Lee

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Hello leva,

Welcome to the seminar!

I think that learning out in the open involves a transition. Ideally, it is good to do this transition within some secure holding practice space, such as a practice social network. Moodle plays such a role, as does the ELGG platform.

I had started out blogging within a cohort as a student, and generally had some idea of what I wanted to do with the content I was posting - I felt some investment in the postings, but once I moved to a more independent learning stance, I began pro-actively posting content and adding tags that would aid me with finding them at a later time - in effect, the tagging aided me with easier retrieval of the personal archive. I shifted from blogging for the course to blogging for oneself.

Taking the plunge into blogging is apt for the metaphor of the swimmer of the data "streams" and "rivers".

Glenn

In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Leva Lee -
Hi Glenn,
It is a transition and a shift in thinking and way of doing things isn't it? Approaching blogging with a focus on the process not on the "perfect end-product" makes it easier (as in writing, making art, creating...)
particularly if you are at the "blogging for myself" stage as I am.

Your edublogging overview has shown the great variety of ways blogging can be done!

Leva
In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Jeffrey Keefer -

Glenn, what a great topic and list of guiding questions to consider.

I have blogged at some time at my blog Silence and Voice and find myself using Twitter on a more regular basis (I Tweet at http://twitter.com/jeffreykeefer). Thus, I have my Tweets stream to my blog once a day to try to capture some of this information.

I blog as an opportunity to reflect on my work and thinking, as well as to share some of my work in the larger community. I find blogging about my research very useful, as the urls that are established make it easy to point back to a specific time or location or frame of thinking as needed. I find my own posting slowing down a bit as my Tweeting has increased. As I find less separating them, they are both becoming increasingly used elements in my work.

Finally, as my research has transitioned from blogging to microblogging to social media in general, it presents interesting opportunities for realistic next steps as I (hopefully!) approach my doctoral thesis topic.

I really look forward to using this SCoPE session to collaboratively think through some of these ideas.

Jeffrey

In reply to Jeffrey Keefer

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Hi Jeffrey,

Welcome to the seminar!

I consider the blogging space a liminal space, a performing space, and a transformative learning space.

I think that a part of becoming more comfortable in the blogging space, especially blogging in the open, is deciding what type of blogging belongs in what space. For example, for me, my blogging activity within the AU Landing has a specific focus: academic activity.

But I have a personal blog, which I don't feel comfortable revealing to the open public at this point. It is embedded in a private sandbox within my literacy blog, at http://edublogging4literacy.edublogs.org and most of those posts will probably one day be made available to the public, but when I am ready, not before.

Recently, I was talking to a colleague about how I have been wanting to enjoy slow-blogging, engage in reflective thoughts and introspection. I really enjoy using the blogs for chronicling my learning journey. Some of my learning is done in the most surprising places in surprising conditions. I keep a private dream diary, and record and archive my ideas on a voice recorder while walking (long, quiet walks far from traffic and noise).

Sometimes I blog for myself, allowing my learning path to take me in different direction each day, and I open up the blog reader for personal growth one day, and open the edublogging blog reader the next day (or open up and read several RSS aggregators on the same day and compile posts on several topics for several blogs).

I think we need to give ourselves more permission to blog for oneself, to engage in pure play with ideas. Sometimes I blog for just me, sometimes to a larger purpose, and I feel a bit odd addressing my diary (I have seen this done in personal blogs, though; for example, take a look at The Random Thoughts of Louis Schmeer).

Looking forward to discussions with you.

Glenn

In reply to Glenn Groulx

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by caren levine -
Greetings! I am glad to see this topic and happy to jump in.

I've been blogging since 2006. I started a couple of blogs that related to different aspects of my work - one as an educator, another as someone interested in technology stewardship, particularly in communities of practice.

Both of those blogs are more labors of love and are not directly job-related, but were created mostly as a space for me to think out loud. One blog has lain fallow for awhile. The other, I do post, but part of my "personal learning plan" for this year is to do so more regularly and to dig a little deeper into things that I'd like to explore. I totally related to Sylvia's comment, by the way, of having a pile of drafts in wordpress!

I co-blog at another work-related blog. And we use blogs to support specific projects, like our "social media boot camps."

It is also worth mentioning that I read - or perhaps more accurately - scan a number of blogs regularly.

I also use twitter, both as a listening post for my own professional/personal learning and to share resources that might be of interest to others.

Things I have been thinking about lately and would like to explore more:
  • blogs as a means of connecting and interacting in "loosely coupled" communities of practice
  • blogging as an educational / learning activity - either as part of the curriculum or as a way of setting up a network/community of learners in formal and informal learning situations
  • blogs as a way of engaging different layers of an educational community - learners, faculty, administrators, parents, outside community members, people who might be looking to connect to the school in some way, etc.
  • Based on the above, I'm wondering, what are implications for design, facilitation, opportunities for engagement?
Thanks for the chance to think out loud!

Caren
In reply to caren levine

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Michael Griffith -
Hi Caren.... as you may have seen I use Blogging in an education setting. One of the most interesting side effects has been the way I have been able to connect disadvantaged students learning ouside the university with students on-campus. But in both cases the only way I can get it to work is to make the blogging a compulsory part of their writing assessment. Without this incentive I feel that Blogging would die on the vine. And this brings with it some other difficulties. By and large colleagues feel that Blogging is a soft option and isn't challenging the students enough. I personally disagree and feel it gives students a dynamic creative space to express themselves in their terms... but other academics are hard to convince on this: tied as they are to more conventional modes of assessment..... just a few thoughts..... and a link to one of my recent success stories:
http://www.acu.edu.au/294135
Cheers
Michael
In reply to Michael Griffith

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Jo Ann Hammond-Meiers -
Dear Michael,
Thanks for sharing this blog -- I want to share the site with my art therapy colleagues and connect that up with you. I'm slowly moving in the blogging area as I seem to read and post on other blogs more than work on my own blogs.
However, I do suffer from being very involved in a number of areas professionally including artmaking.

I'm very excited that Glenn is doing the blogging SCoPE webinar as he has so much to share in this area as he has been dedicated to writing and gathering what blogging is about as a rather new social, educational phenomenon.

I see so many important ways to reach out to many and I see that through the blogs, I am learning a lot about the heart of blogging.

Thanks again for sharing with us, Jo Ann
In reply to Jo Ann Hammond-Meiers

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Hi Jo Ann,

Welcome to the blogging seminar!

I am very interested in learning more about using blogs for individual and collaborative artmaking, storybuilding and storytelling. This has tremendous potential for use with learners.

Looking forward to talking with you.

Glenn

In reply to Michael Griffith

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Hello Michael,

Thank you for this link.

I am an adult literacy instructor teaching English and Computers at Northwest Community College, in Prince Rupert, BC. I work with First Nations students and support remote delivery of upgrading courses for adult learners living in remote communities. This example of connecting off-campus leaners with on-campus learners is an amazing example of how to integrate blogging into instruction.

Blogging, for me, involves explorations, where learners engage in guided discovery learning. I use the image of the collection of kites flying high all tied to their guides by a string.

I was asked at a conference about the issue of assessment for students who are blogging. I came up with a tentative idea of tethered assessment - rather than placing assessment first, and then preparing an activity to match the outcomes, as is done in formal learning, blogging encourages us to engage in praxis, to perceive assessment in terms of how well a previously encountered event or activity has prepared us for the current event or activity. In effect, learners assess their learning based on how well it "fits" into the current requirements. A useful learning activity, then, for a blogger, is one that has had high relevance to current conditions, and one that has been referred to repeatedly over time to inform current/future practice.

Just an open thought- discussion?

Glenn

Attachment explorations.jpg
In reply to Michael Griffith

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Emma Duke-Williams -
Michael,
You've said:
By and large colleagues feel that Blogging is a soft option and isn't challenging the students enough. I personally disagree and feel it gives students a dynamic creative space to express themselves in their terms... but other academics are hard to convince on this: tied as they are to more conventional modes of assessment..... just a few thoughts

(what happened to the quote feature??)

... anyway, I read "The Effect of Twitter on college student engagement & grades" today.
I'm not sure you'll be able to open it - it's possible that I can because I'm on campus & we have access to the journal via the library - in case you can't, the abstract concludes:
"This study provides experimental evidence that Twitter can be used as an educational tool to help engage students and to mobilize faculty into a more active and participatory role."

I know that Glenn said it was Twitter next week, but as I'd read that today, it was fresh in my mind!
In reply to Emma Duke-Williams

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Sylvia Currie -
Emma asks: (what happened to the quote feature??)

Good question! We did a security upgrade on the site last week so it might be related to that. Looking into it!
In reply to caren levine

Re: What is your experience with blogging?

by Glenn Groulx -

Hello Caren,

Welcome to the seminar!

I have noticed that some bloggers change their focus over time, and emphasize their more personal side and shrink their professional blogging blogging activities, or shift it into lower gear.

How has your own blogging style changed over time?

What kind of coordinating activities do you engage in to manage your contributions across multiple learning networks? (Here is my response from my own blog).

Looking forward to the discussions!

Glenn

In reply to Glenn Groulx

Different levels of blogging

by Sylvia Currie -
Earlier this week I followed this link from Stephen Downe's blog to a post by Kim Cofino, an educational technology facilitator. She tells a story about working with English Department to introduce blogging into the curriculum. (I love these unexpected, relevant meanderings that start when I open Google Reader!)

Kim posted an excerpt from Will Richardson’s Blogs, Wikis, Podcast and Other Powerful Web Tools for the Classroom on different levels of blogging:
Posting assignments (Not blogging) Journaling, i.e. “this is what I did today.” (Not blogging) Posting links. (Not blogging) Links with descriptive annotation, i.e., “This site is about…” (Not really blogging either, but getting close depending on the depth of the description). Links with analysis that gets into the meaning of the content being linked. (A simple form of blogging). Reflective, metacognitive writing on practice without links. (Complex writing, but simple blogging, I think. Commenting would probably fall in here somewhere). Links with analysis and synthesis that articulate a deeper understanding or relationship to the content being linked and written with potential audience in mind. (Real blogging). Extended analysis and synthesis over a longer period of time that builds on previous posts, links, and comments. (Complex blogging).
I had come across this continuum before, but hadn't really thought about it in terms of my own blogging practice. Looking at #7 and #8 I'm beginning to understand why I have so many drafts. It takes a lot of time and effort to do "real blogging". I like the way Glenn simply calls this a "sandbox". I've decided not to let my huge number of draft posts weigh me down! approve

Another way to look at different levels of blogging is to think about your audience. Who are you writing for and what do you expect from your readers? How interested are you in the connective nature of blogs, and the dialogue that builds around ideas posted on your blog? I've heard bloggers say "I don't blog for other people; my blog is just for myself". (I don't believe them for a minute!) Others take great care to respond to comments, track readership, notice how others are referencing their blogs, etc.

What would a 'who are you writing for' continuum look like?

In reply to Sylvia Currie

Re: Different levels of blogging

by Glenn Groulx -

Hi Sylvia,

My interpretation of blogging differs from Will Richardson's perspective.

I think that what Mr. Richardson is describing is not having to do with blogging per se, but with the cognitive process of sense-making, a key component of critical thinking. His continuum describes the levels of critical thinking, most of which can be supported by current blogging tools to various degrees, depending on the pedagogy (instructional strategies) used.

I think that dismissing journaling and annotating resources as not part of blogging is surprising. However, I think we need to place the cited content in the context of which it was originally written. The dismissal of reflective, metacognitive writing (where links are absent) is underplaying/distorting a crucial motivation for why many bloggers capture their ideas. Briefly put, if it is using a blogging tool, it is "blogging".

I referred to level one blogging activities, called berry-picking, many of which are covered in Will Richardson's continuum of blogging.

Background Reading: Berry-picking activities

Take a look at these posts demonstrating berry-picking:

exemplar one: link log

exemplar two: significant learning

exemplar three:

Annotated Bookmark Summary
In reply to Sylvia Currie

Re: Different levels of blogging: Identifying the Audience

by Glenn Groulx -

Narcissistic Blogger

Autonomous Blogger

Social Blogger

Reluctant Blogger

Defensive Blogger

Addressivity

Indifferent to audience

Invites and welcomes audience

Requires others as audience

Overwhelmed by audience

Apologetic or Attacking

Compassion

N/A - writes for oneself

Minimal - Focus is on self-interest

Variable - conditional on others

Minimal – over-concerned

None – competitive, combative

Responsiveness to Feedback by Others

Absent

Self-critical –

Independent of Others

Variable - Contingent on Others

Internal – Critical of Self

External –

Critical of Others

Authenticity

Distorted

Independent

Inter-subjective

Hidden

Distorted

Productivity

Variable

Optimal

Variable

Minimal

Variable

Here is my take on the issue of addressivity (blogging for different audiences). Perhaps we can ask our learners to adopt different "voices" that address different audiences.