Educational Uses of iPads: October 18-29, 2010

Flash & HTML5

Flash & HTML5

by Brent Lee -
Number of replies: 11
There was some discussion on Flash and HTML5 in the first session relating to the iPad.

Please find this link to an HTML5 demonstration:

http://www.thewildernessdowntown.com/

Cheers,

Brent.
In reply to Brent Lee

Re: Flash & HTML5

by Heidi Piltz -
Hello Brent

I just tried to view this HTML5 demonstration, on Google Chrome (running on my Windows computer), and it was unpleasantly jerky, so I didn't watch it through. My processor must be too wimpy to run it, I guess. I haven't put Google Chrome on my aging MacBook, as I felt having 3 browsers would be a bit silly, and the iPad which I have on loan for the 2-week duration of this iPad seminar, comes with Safari - and I'm not even sure I could download Google Chrome onto it, even if I wanted to. Besides, it's not mine, so I don't want to mess around with it too much.
In reply to Heidi Piltz

Re: Flash & HTML5

by Emma Duke-Williams -
It was pretty jerky on my Mac too ... I'd not have said it was that old ( c. 18 months ) but I guess in hardware terms it probably is!

Actually, it seemed far less jerky in Firefox 3.6.11 than it did in Chrome 7.0.517.41 on my Mac mini ( 2.26 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo/ 4GB ram / Mac OS X 10.6.4) but, maybe that's because I used firefox second; perhaps I wasn't expecting too much speed!

(Yes, I had closed other stuff before starting either)
In reply to Heidi Piltz

Re: Flash & HTML5

by Brent Lee -
Heidi,

This is typically the experience with computers trying to run HTML5.

As our technology catches up to the software, this type of delivery will become the future.

The question is where will we use the technology, the laptop, the tablet, or something we have yet to see?

--Brent
In reply to Brent Lee

Re: Flash & HTML5

by Heidi Piltz -
I am finding the lack of Flash to be a serious detractor: yesterday, I brought my freshly-borrowed iPad into the classroom, and wanted to play a "live" story from TumbleBooks Library to my K/1 class. Bombed: uses flash, apparently. I tried to access one of our frequently-used literacy websites, with reading activities: starfall.com - no go - needs flash. I went to Worldbook online (via our district's subscription portal), and found, of course, that the video content is frozen.
Just now, I tried to view a video embedded in a Facebook posting, and it too failed to run. This is madness! How could they cripple Facebook's function, with their claim to be so wonderful for social networking! I am dumbfounded. I keep reading that you have to let go of all your previous "antiquated" ways of using technology, and adopt new ones via all the apps, but I now have a growing feeling of resistance, due to this rapid succession of flash-related failures!!
In reply to Brent Lee

Re: Flash & HTML5: What does Apple actually say??

by Derek Chirnside -
I have not really engaged with the critical question: what does Apple have against Flash? Can someone point me to some critical links?
Apologies if you have covered this off in the current discussion: I missed it.

-Derek
In reply to Derek Chirnside

Re: Flash & HTML5: What does Apple actually say??

by Paul Left -
HI Derek, good to see you here. A couple of pages that might be relevant:

  • http://mashable.com/2010/04/29/apple-flash-html5/
  • http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/06/apple-slaps-adobes-flash-with-ipad-friendly-html5-showcase/
  • http://www.onlinevideo.net/2010/09/html5-what-you-need-to-know/

Paul

In reply to Paul Left

Re: Flash & HTML5: What does Apple actually say??

by Derek Chirnside -
OK, Paul, got it.

WHY APPLE HATES FLASH

In summary:

In short, Steve Jobs claims Flash drains the battery of mobile devices; it’s not very good for multi-touch operation; and its performance, reliability and security are all shoddy. It’s also a proprietary system, and while Jobs admits that their mobile OS is also proprietary, he claims that web standards should be open, like HTML5, CSS and JavaScript.

Most importantly Apple doesn’t want “a third party layer of software [to] come between the platform and the developer.” Finally, Jobs concludes, Flash is a relic. “Flash was created during the PC era –- for PCs and mice,” he says, “but the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards –- all areas where Flash falls short.”

From http://mashable.com/2010/04/29/steve-jobs-flash-is-no-longer-necessary/ which includes the whole letter from Steve Jobs.

One thing it seems we need to understand (among others) is H.264, the role of flash video, clist to the metal and overheads.

Tx

In reply to Derek Chirnside

Re: Flash & HTML5: What does Apple actually say??

by Nick Noakes -
They are already back talking and working on it / finding a way through it - perhaps via a 3rd party app.
In reply to Nick Noakes

Re: Flash & HTML5: What does Apple actually say??

by WL Wong -
Some require jailbreaking the iPad.
In reply to Nick Noakes

Re: Flash & HTML5: What does Apple actually say??

by Derek Chirnside -
Why HTML5 is not the whole answer yet.

"HTML5—Sounds Great, but there’s a Big Catch From http://www.onlinevideo.net/2010/09/html5-what-you-need-to-know/

At its highest level, HTML5 sounds great. Simpler is always better, and if you don’t need a plug-in to play a video file, that’s one less item for potential viewers to download. The problem is that—at least today—only around 50 percent of available browsers support HTML5, and more importantly, the W3C hasn’t specified one codec that must play in all browsers.

For example, suppose you bought Apple’s argument that HTML5 was better, dropped your current plug-in-based technology, and produced your website in an HTML5-compatible format that played on the iPad. To accomplish this, you’d have to encode your video in H.264 format, which is the only format that plays on the iPad.

Sounds good, until you realize that less than ten percent of those browsing to your website from their computers can play the file, since only Apple Safari and Google Chrome – both around 5 percent market penetration – can play HTML5 video in H.264 format. Those visiting your site via Mozilla Firefox could not play the video, since Firefox can’t play H.264-encoded video. This is particularly significant since Firefox – at 23 percent market share – is by far the most popular HTML5-compatible browser.

To play in Firefox, and the Opera browser, you’d have to encode your video into the Ogg Theora format, which is much lower quality than H.264 and isn’t supported in any of the more popular encoding programs like Adobe Media Encoder, Apple Compressor, Sorenson Squeeze, or Telestream Episode. This means that you’ll likely have to use a command line encoding tool to achieve the best results.

Once you produce in H.264 and Ogg format, you still only have—at most—40 percent or so of potential viewers that can play your files. To satisfy the rest, you still have to make your video available using your plug-in based technology, which is typically Flash using the VP6 codec. Operationally, code on your web page would query the browser as to its capabilities—if it was HTML5 compatible, it would send the video encoded in the proper format, if not, it would revert to the plug-in.

Google’s WebM technology, which is currently supported in Opera and will be supported in upcoming versions of the Firefox and Chrome browsers, does little to break the logjam, since Apple won’t support it, and Internet Explorer 9 will only support it if already installed on the system. Of course, until WebM support becomes pervasive, you’ll still have to encode in H.264 for Safari, Chrome, and Internet Explorer 9; Ogg for older versions of Firefox and Opera; WebM for newer versions of Firefox, Opera and Chrome; and potentially VP6 for Flash (or Windows Media for Silverlight).

By this point, you have to be asking yourself if the extra work is really worth it. This turns out to be a very good question."

This is a bit beyond me at the moment.

Why doesn't Firefox play H.264? Are people at these web video standard deciding conferences stupid?

In reply to Nick Noakes

Re: Flash & HTML5: What does Apple actually say??

by WL Wong -
And via @mashable Adobe Demos Flash-to-HTML5 Conversion Tool [VIDEO] http://mashable.com/2010/10/28/flash-html5-conversion-tool/