Intellectual Property: January 9 -29, 2008

For Your Amusement....Copyright

For Your Amusement....Copyright

by Dan McGuire -
Number of replies: 5

I am still amazed this video is still online....

In reply to Dan McGuire

Open Weekend: Copyright and ownership of content

by Sylvia Currie -
Here is the upcoming Open Weekend session at Knowplace for everyone:

===snip===
Feb 1 - 3, 2008 - New Ways To Look At Content Ownership

Location:
http://knowplace.ca
Facilitator:
Elderbob Brannan, USA

Copyright and Content Ownership continue to be awash in the waves of a rough Web 2.0 sea. Does this mean a review and continuation of the old copyright rules, or a new and unique way to consider internet ownership of properties? With the RIAA, Blackboard, Lawrence Lessig and others preaching to the choir, maybe it's time for us to get familiar with some of the terms and ways to consider this potential continuation or change. Join us to brainstorm about what comes next.

About Elderbob Brannan:
Elderbob
is the Coordinator of Open Weekends here at Knowplace. He claims to be "retired", but we know him as a infopreneur (dealer in internet information) and geriatrigeek (A geek over 60). He is currently enrolled in graduate schools and is a member of numerous online communities of practice.
===snip===
In reply to Dan McGuire

Copyright - sharing & remixing

by Sylvia Currie -
That Dan showed us is a hoot. So many questions come to mind -- mainly is the person who made the video in jail? wink

It does illustrate how ease of sharing and remixing can spark the creativity gene! A little story...

Years ago I worked on a fascinating software project for k-12 (called Zebu)). It was based on a project-based instructional model and was essentially object-oriented wiki pages before we really talked about wiki pages. Pages could be co-created, and there were object media types that could be placed on the page, and students could comment on other students' projects right on their pages. This was the early days of web browsers so was a big deal then.

Having students do web research and creating their own web-based resources was completely new. My role was mostly working with teachers to integrate this new technology into the curriculum.

The newly-discovered technical ability for students to grab images from the web and organize them into their own project space got them excited about their projects, but at the same time the whole process got really bogged down by attention to copyright. In the absence of creative commons licences we were faced with permission requests and all the rest of it. It was complicated and time-consuming!

As Betty points out in her introduction, as a teacher she is "appreciative of creative commons licensing" and also is aware of "increasing concern" around violation of copyright as teachers become more "more proficient at scanning and creating pdf versions of materials we use". In education it feels like we're making headway in terms of the importance of sharing (Alice and Gina have posted here that they use creative commons licensing) but it's interesting how what is technically possible (click, grab, copy, paste, remix) and the intended use of those resources, is still out of balance.

In my own practice I come across violation of copyright all the time. For example, for many instructors there's a tendency to transfer the print copy rules to the online environment. And why wouldn't they have that tendancy? If you are used to photocopying articles and handing them out to students in class, why would it be different handing them out through an an online course environment?

It's mostly about education and awareness... which is why we have SCoPE seminars on topics like this! approve Is copyright a confusing topic for people at your institutions? Do people gloss over when you start explaining this stuff?



In reply to Dan McGuire

Copyright - sharing and remixing

by Sylvia Currie -
Pardon the flurry! I've been mostly traveling or fighting flus and what all else all month so I'm only now finding the energy to dig into this topic. And wouldn't you know it's the last scheduled day of the seminar! thoughtful

I came across something in my wanderings that is BIG news. Lawrence Lessig negotiated with his publisher, Random House, the free distribution of his books. http://lessig.org/blog/2008/01/the_future_of_ideas_is_now_fre_1.html It will be interesting to see how this all works as a business model, especially for textbooks. As Irwin pointed out, he appreciates the online resources publishing companies make available to complement their textbooks. That model has worked because students still purchase the books.

Some interesting commentary follows Lessig's blog post as well. In particular, consider this question from Vicky Davis:

"As a teacher, I certainly wish that textbook makers would consider such licensing to make textbooks and the curriculum they represent more "mashable." Interestingly, while schools often require students to use creative commons licensed work, I find it interesting that my family members in college say that the student-produced work is licensed "All Rights Reserved" to the college itself by name and not even giving credit to the student. This gives the college full rights to resell."




In reply to Dan McGuire

Re: For Your Amusement....Copyright

by David Brear -
Dan and others, here is a link from Stephen Downes newsletter from January 28, http://creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/8000

"I wouldn’t steal is a new and cute one minute video making the case that sharing is fair and people who would never steal a handbag, car, or television nevertheless download film and music. Whatever you think of that, there’s no ambiguity around downloading and remixing I wouldn’t steal — it is licensed under CC Attribution-NonCommercial."

In reply to David Brear

Re: For Your Amusement....Copyright

by Dan McGuire -
While i agree that there are some issues with the short 'downloading is stealing' - I can't support the arguments presented by 'I wouldn't steal'. First downloading movies via un-authorized channels is illegal...hence the term illegal downloading. The authors of this video object to the film industry lobbying for changes to the law, they object to the film industry producing propaganda....all the while using propaganda to lobby for their own changes to the law.

Sharing is awesome, and i support that 100% - but i also acknowledge that i can only share my ideas and my work - I have no right to share YOUR work for you.